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College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Psychology Faculty - Stephanie Babb

Stephanie Babb, Ph.D.

Stephanie Babb, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology Coordinator of Psychology

Office: N1072
(713) 223-7918
babbs@uhd.edu

​Dr. Babb became an Assistant Professor in Psychology at UHD in 2007, after completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. She became the coordinator of psychology in 2012, and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2013. She teaches biological psychology, developmental psychology, and research methods in psychology.


​Doctorate degree: Psychology (University of Georgia)

​Biological Psychology – 3311

Human Growth and Development – 2310

Child Psychology – 3303

Comparative Psychology – 4318

Psychology of Memory – 4321

Adolescent Psychology – 3305

Research Methods – 3320

​Dr. Babb earned her Ph.D. in Psychology, with a focus on Neuroscience and Behavior, in 2006 from the University of Georgia. Her dissertation, “Episodic-like Memory in the Rat,” was the culmination of research in the area of episodic memory in non-human animals. Her focus is biological and cognitive psychology, especially comparative cognition, which qualifies her to teach courses such as Biological Psychology, Psychology of Memory, and Comparative Psychology. She also completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston; her research-based graduate program and post-doc qualify her to teach Research Methods in Psychology. She has also mentored over 100 undergraduates in research projects at UHD. Her research program at UHD includes memory and facial recognition bias in humans (see below). Dr. Babb also teaches developmental courses such as Human Growth and Development and Child Psychology. She completed two undergraduate internship projects on parenting behaviors, and completed undergraduate and graduate developmental courses. She also studied the development of memory in children as a part of her dissertation, and began teaching developmental psychology in 2005. She also conducts research in educational psychology and adult learning (see below).

Teaching Experience:

2007 – Present: University of Houston-Downtown, Assistant and Associate Professor of Psychology 2007: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Post-doctoral Fellow      

2005 – 2006: Athens Technical College, Adjunct Faculty

Academic Scholarship/Research/Creative Endeavors:

Babb, S., Stewart, C., & Johnson, R. (2013). Applying the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education to blended learning environments. In: Practical Applications in Blended Learning Environments: Experiences in K-20 Education. Eds. Kyei-Blankson, L., & Ntuli, E. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Babb, S.J. & Johnson, R.M. (2010|2011). Object, spatial, and temporal memory: A behavioral analysis of visual scenes using a what, where, and when paradigm. Current Psychology Letters: Behaviour, Brain, & Cognition, 26(2). http://cpl.revues.org/pdf/5020.

Babb, S., Stewart, C., & Johnson, R. (2010). Constructing communication in blended learning environments: Perceptions of good practice in hybrid courses. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6(4), 735-753.

Stewart, C., Bachman, C., & Babb, S. (2009). Replacing professor monologues with online dialogues: A constructivist approach to online course template design. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 5(3), 1-11.

Crystal, J.D. & Babb, S.J. (2008). Spatial memory in rats after 25 hours. Learning and Motivation, 39, 278-284.

Babb, S.J. & Crystal, J.D. (2006). Discrimination of what, when, and where in rats is not based on time of day. Learning and Behavior, 34(2), 124-130.Babb, S.J. & Crystal, J.D. (2006). Episodic-like memory in the rat. Current Biology, 16, 1317-1321.

Babb, S.J. & Crystal, J.D. (2005). Discrimination of what, when, and where:  Implications for episodic-like memory in rats. Learning and Motivation, 36(2), 177-189.

Dr. Babb’s graduate and postdoctoral research focused on episodic and recognition memory in animals and humans, and she has carried that research agenda over to UHD. In addition to researching memory in humans, Dr. Babb’s research agenda includes educational practices, goals, and successes in nontraditional students and best practices for hybrid courses, as well as facial recognition bias across gender and race.

Babb, S., Stewart, C., & Johnson, R. (2013). Applying the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education to blended learning environments. In: Practical Applications in Blended Learning Environments: Experiences in K-20 Education. Eds. Kyei-Blankson, L., & Nautili, E. Hers hey, PA: IGI Global.

Babb, S., Stewart, C., & Bachman, C. (2012). Gender, ethnic, age, and relationship differences in non-traditional college student alcohol consumption: A trichinae study. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 11(1), 22-47.

Babb, S.J. & Johnson, R.M. (2010|2011). Object, spatial, and temporal memory: A behavioral analysis of visual scenes using a what, where, and when paradigm. Current Psychology Letters: Be ha vi our, Brain, & Cognition, 26(2). http://cupriferous/PDF/5020.

Babb, S., Stewart, C., & Johnson, R. (2010). Constructing communication in blended learning environments: Perceptions of good practice in hybrid courses. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6(4), 735-753.

Babb, S., Crone, T., & Johnson, R. (2015, January). Predicting success in nontraditional undergraduate students. Presentation accepted for the 2015 International Education Conference, The Clue Institute, Maui, HI.

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Last updated 6/7/2017 10:28 AM