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2015 Fall

Borders Crossing: Race, Nation and Human Rights
October 8, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. in N1099

 This event will be a multimedia presentation by Dr. Christine Kovic, of University of Houston - Clear Lake and Francisco Arguelles, who have conducted long-term research and engaged in organizing on border politics and human rights. The presentation will address the violence and solidarity that migrants encounter in their journey through Mexico and in South Texas. This event is an intellectual extension our freshman convocation/summer reader Into the Beautiful North by Luis Alberto Urrea, which vividly captures the complex and often brutal experiences of Mexicans and Central Americans migrating to the United States for work. Refreshments will be served.  View the event poster.

Dr. Christen Kovic is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Clear Lake and author of Mayan Voices for Human Rights: Displaced Catholics in Highland Chipas, Women of Chipas: Making History in Times of Struggle and Hope.

Francisco Arguelles is a community organizer specializing in border politics and human rights.

Photograph of Dr. Christien Kovic  Photograph of Fransico Argello
Dr. Christen Kovic           Fransico Arguelles

UHD Welcomes Dr. Cornel West
November 6, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. in Robertson Auditorium

Photograph of Dr. Cornel WestOne of the foremost human rights activists of our contemporary era, Dr. West will talk on race, America and the Black Lives Matter movement.  His presentation is part of UHD's celebration of Citizenship Month and its ongoing commitment to community engagement and social justice. 

This is a ticked event with limited seating available. Free tickets will be provided on a first-come basis during mid-October. View the event poster.

This lecture is supported by the Center for Critical Race Studies, the Cultural Enrichment Center, the Departments of Arts and Humanities, English, and Social Sciences.


Hispanic Heritage Month 2015Female hispanic dancer in traditional dress

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH HSI WEEK
Viewing of The Other Side of Immigration, film by Roy Germano, featuring special guest discussion facilitator, Provost Ed Hugetz.
11:30 A.M. -1:00 P.M., A300 
Host: STAR Program; Center Diversity & Inclusion; Freshmen Convocation Committee 
A powerful documentary that examines the divisive issue of undocumented immigration from the perspective of members of a Mexican agricultural community whose economy has been destroyed by NAFTA. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH HSI WEEK
Second viewing and discussion of The Other Side of Immigration
1:00 - 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
A second viewing and discussion of the film for those unable to attend the Monday screening.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21ST
Viewing of A Class Apart: A Mexican American Civil Rights Story, by Carlos Sandoval. Discussion to follow.
1:00 - 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of a landmark legal case stemming from the 1951 murder of a field hand, Pete Hernandez, in Edna, Texas. The case, Hernandez v. Texas, was argued before the Supreme Court and challenged systemic, rampant discrimination against Mexican Americans.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22ND
"No Time Like the Present - The Hispanic Civic Engagement Imperative"
11:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M., Mural Area; 12:00 – 1:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion; Mi Familia Vota
Presentation and discussion of the urgent need for sustained Hispanic civic engagement, accompanied by a voter registration drive. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23RD
Film Screening: Before God We're All Family
4:30 – 6:00 P.M., Auditorium
Host: UHD LULAC 22268; HACU
LGBT Issues in the Hispanic Community 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH
Second Viewing of A Class Apart: A Mexican American Civil Rights Story with discussion.
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of a landmark legal case stemming from the 1951 murder of a field hand, Pete Hernandez, in Edna, Texas. The case, Hernandez v. Texas, was argued before the Supreme Court and challenged systemic, rampant discrimination against Mexican Americans. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH
Viewing of Hispanic Hollywood: Then and Now, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of the contributions of Hispanic performers in American cinema, as well as the evolving representation of the Hispanic subject in Hollywood film. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH
Second viewing of Hispanic Hollywood: Then and Now, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
 An examination of the contributions of Hispanic performers in American cinema, as well as the evolving representation of the Hispanic subject in Hollywood film. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6TH
Viewing of The Harvest [la Cosecha], a film by U. Roberto Romano, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. The Harvest/la Cosecha profiles these three as they journey from the scorching heat of Texas' onion fields to the winter snows of the Michigan apple orchards and back south to the humidity of Florida's tomato fields to follow the harvest. 

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH
Second viewing of The Harvest [la Cosecha], a film by U. Roberto Romano, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. The Harvest/la Cosecha profiles these three as they journey from the scorching heat of Texas' onion fields to the winter snows of the Michigan apple orchards and back south to the humidity of Florida's tomato fields to follow the harvest.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 12TH
Viewing of Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation, pt. V - Prejudice and Pride, with discussion.
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
In the 1960s and 1970s a generation of Mexican Americans, frustrated by persistent discrimination and poverty, find a new way forward, through social action and the building of a new "Chicano" identity. By the end of the 1970s Chicano activism and identity have transformed what it means to be an American. Chicano and Latino studies are incorporated into school curriculum; Latinos are included in the political process. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13TH
"When Political Discourse Goes Toxic: Lessons from the Holocaust and Contemporary Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric," panel discussion.
12:00 – 2:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion; La Familia Vota; Holocaust Museum Houston
A panel discussion examining the disturbing parallels between anti-Semitic rhetoric in pre-WWII Germany and anti-(Hispanic)immigrant rhetoric in the United States today.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15TH
Viewing of Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation, pt. VI - Peril and Promise, with discussion.
1:00 to 3:00 P.M., N420
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Latinos present a challenge and an opportunity for the United States. America's largest and youngest growing sector of the population presents what Professor Marta Tienda calls, The Hispanic Moment. Their success could determine the growth of the United States in the twenty-first century; however their failure, contributing to an underclass, could also pull this country down. The key, according to Tienda and Eduardo J. Padron, Ph.D., President of Miami Dade Community College, is education.

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Last updated 9/3/2019 12:28 PM