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2015 Events

UHD Scholars Create High-Impact Experience for Second Ward Students

Photograph of students from the Second Ward reading in a class roomUHD Students in Vida Robertson’s African American Literature and English Composition courses recently took their studies from the classroom to the real world, as they partnered with Ripley House Neighborhood Center to create a high-impact educational opportunity for students in Houston’s Second Ward.

More than 100 students ranging in age from five to 17 participated in the summer literacy program, during which UHD students read to them and led informed discussions on the impact of race on the lives of characters portrayed in respective narratives as well as on the lives of actual people in our day-to-day experiences. As a part of this Big Read event, the Center for Critical Race Studies provided each Second Ward student with a personal copy of the text to share with their family and friends at home following the program. 


CCRS Second Annual Big Read/Read Out Event Volunteers group photo
Second Annual
CCRS Read Out - Volunteers, June 2015  


Photograph of Dr. Erin Morles-Williams Dr. Erin "Mari" Morales-Williams, Gender Conference Keynote Speaker
April 2, 2015

The dynamic conference will include presentations by UHD faculty and students exploring the ways in which gender relates to sexual and domestic violence, race, media, education, literature and the workplace.

Born in East Harlem and raised in the Bronx, keynote speaker,  Dr. Mari is a community based healer, educator, and activist. For over a decade she has taught and directed a wide range of programs in schools and community organizations throughout New York City and Philadelphia. She is currently the founder and director T.U.F.F. (Turn Up for Freedom) Girls, an arts based and activist driven community leadership program for Black and Latina youth.

Morales-Williams earned her Master's and Ph.D. in Urban Education from Temple University and her dissertation, Tough Love: Young Urban Women of Color as Public Pedagogues and Their Lessons of Race, Gender, and Sexuality, was also awarded by the Myra Sadker Foundation in 2011. She taught teacher education at its College of Education for several years and recently rejoined Temple's faculty as an adjunct where she teaches the course, Education for Liberation. Morales-Williams will discuss the emotional and mental experiences she had during her dissertation field experience at a teen summer camp within a community center in her hometown of the Bronx, NY.


Students and the Struggle for Justice: A Panel Discussion

Freedom Riders film poster black white photo of busUHD students, faculty and staff are invited to attend "Students and the Struggle for Justice," a panel discussion to be held on Feb. 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Wilhelmina Cullen Robertson Auditorium.

The panel will comprise former and current student activists who will discuss their personal experiences. Attendees will view clips from the "Freedom Riders" documentary, discuss past and present social justice initiatives, and meet distinguished panelists who contributed to the Civil Rights Movement. 

The panelists include:

• Herbert Hamilton, a Texas Southern University alumnus and civil rights activist who participated in the Freedom Ride from Los Angeles to Houston in 1961,

• The Rev. Dr. Virgil Wood, a Baptist minister who served on the board of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and worked directly with Martin Luther King, Jr.,

• Biko Gray, local activist and graduate student at Rice University, and

• Tarah Taylor, UHD student and local community organizer.

The event is sponsored by Created Equal, the Center for Critical Race Studies, and the Department of Social Sciences. Refreshments will be provided.


Black History Month Events

February 17, 2015
Houston Equal Rights Ordinance

N1099, 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

February 18, 2015
Police Brutality Fishbowl

N602, 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

February 19, 2015
Black History Jeopardy

N420, 12:11 p.m. - 2:11 p.m.

You Know Your Rights: A Criminal Perspective
C100, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

February 23, 2015
You Know Your Rights: A Civil / Law Enforcement Perspective

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

February 25, 2015
Let the Drums Speak

Auditorium, 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Cosponsored by the Center for Diversity & Inclusion


Jimmy Santiago Baca is CCRS 2015 Scholar-in-Residence


UHD’s Center for Critical Race Studies (CCRS) proudly announces the poet, essayist, screenwriter, and activist Jimmy Santiago Baca as our 2015 Scholar-in-Residence. Mr. Baca is an internationally-celebrated writer, known for such works as Immigrants in Our Own Land, Working in the Dark: Reflections of a Poet of the Barrio, Winter Poems Along the Rio Grande, and Healing Earthquakes. He is the recipient of a number of prestigious awards for his work, including the American Book Award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Literature for Martin and Meditations on the South Valley, the International Prize for A Place to Stand, as well as, two Southwest Book Awards, the Pushcart Prize, and the National Poetry Award.

During his time at UHD, Mr. Baca will read from his work, host public talks, guide faculty seminars, conduct students workshops, lead service and community learning engagements, and screen his newly released documentary A Place to Stand: The Making of a Poet. Mr. Baca’s inspiring life, vision, and unwavering commitment to social justice will serve as a catalyst for the campus to continue to transform the minds and lives of our students and communities.

January 26, 2015
Meeting with members of the Hispanic Male Initiative and Black Male Initiative
N420, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Writer’s Workshop for Poets, Novelists and Screenwriters
Cosponsored by the English Department
S1070, 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

January 27, 2015
Faculty Development Seminar-Engaging Underprivileged Students
A711, 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Meet with the Fellows of the Center for Critical Race Studies
Rockwell Room, 2:00 a.m. - 1 1:30 a.m.

A Place to Stand: The Making of a Poet —Documentary Screening
Discussion, Public Reception and Book Signing will directly follow
Robertson Auditorium, 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

January 28, 2015
Faculty Development Seminar-Engaging Underprivileged Students
A711, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Interview on HTV—Center for Critical Race Studies Interview Series
City Hall Building 901 Bagby, 5:30 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.

January 29, 2015
Critical Race Studies Annual Lecture Series
Lecture, Book Signing and Public Reception

Co-sponsored by the Center for Public Service and Family Strengths
Robertson Auditorium, 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

January 30, 2015
Kegan State Jail— Lecture and Poetry Reading
Co-sponsored by the University-Jailhouse Literacy Program
(led by Drs. Jackson and Farris)

Meet with members of the Student Government/Leadership
Rockwell Room, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

January 31, 2015
Teacher’s Seminar—Collegiate & High School Teachers
Co-sponsored by the Urban Education Department
C100, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.


Borders Crossing: Race, Nation and Human Rights
October 8, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. in N1099

This event will be a multimedia presentation by Dr. Christine Kovic, of University of Houston - Clear Lake and Francisco Arguelles, who have conducted long-term research and engaged in organizing on border politics and human rights. The presentation will address the violence and solidarity that migrants encounter in their journey through Mexico and in South Texas. This event is an intellectual extension our freshman convocation/summer reader Into the Beautiful North by Luis Alberto Urrea, which vividly captures the complex and often brutal experiences of Mexicans and Central Americans migrating to the United States for work. Refreshments will be served.  View the event poster.

Dr. Christen Kovic is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Clear Lake and author of Mayan Voices for Human Rights: Displaced Catholics in Highland Chipas, Women of Chipas: Making History in Times of Struggle and Hope.

Francisco Arguelles is a community organizer specializing in border politics and human rights.

Photograph of Dr. Christien Kovic  Photograph of Fransico Argello
Dr. Christen Kovic           Fransico Arguelles

UHD Welcomes Dr. Cornel West
November 6, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. in Robertson Auditorium

Photograph of Dr. Cornel WestOne of the foremost human rights activists of our contemporary era, Dr. West will talk on race, America and the Black Lives Matter movement.  His presentation is part of UHD's celebration of Citizenship Month and its ongoing commitment to community engagement and social justice. 

View the event poster.

This lecture is supported by the Center for Critical Race Studies, the Cultural Enrichment Center, the Departments of Arts and Humanities, English, and Social Sciences.


Hispanic Heritage Month 2015Female hispanic dancer in traditional dress

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH HSI WEEK
Viewing of The Other Side of Immigration, film by Roy Germano, featuring special guest discussion facilitator,
Provost Ed Hugetz.
11:30 A.M. -1:00 P.M., A300 

Host: STAR Program; Center Diversity & Inclusion; Freshmen Convocation Committee 
A powerful documentary that examines the divisive issue of undocumented immigration from the perspective of members of a Mexican agricultural community whose economy has been destroyed by NAFTA. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH HSI WEEK
Second viewing and discussion of The Other Side of Immigration
1:00 - 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
A second viewing and discussion of the film for those unable to attend the Monday screening.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21ST
Viewing of A Class Apart: A Mexican American Civil Rights Story, by Carlos Sandoval. Discussion to follow.
1:00 - 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of a landmark legal case stemming from the 1951 murder of a field hand, Pete Hernandez, in Edna, Texas. The case, Hernandez v. Texas, was argued before the Supreme Court and challenged systemic, rampant discrimination against Mexican Americans.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22ND
"No Time Like the Present - The Hispanic Civic Engagement Imperative"
11:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M., Mural Area; 12:00 – 1:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion; Mi Familia Vota
Presentation and discussion of the urgent need for sustained Hispanic civic engagement, accompanied by a voter registration drive. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23RD
Film Screening: Before God We're All Family
4:30 – 6:00 P.M., Auditorium
Host: UHD LULAC 22268; HACU
LGBT Issues in the Hispanic Community 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH
Second Viewing of A Class Apart: A Mexican American Civil Rights Story with discussion.
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of a landmark legal case stemming from the 1951 murder of a field hand, Pete Hernandez, in Edna, Texas. The case, Hernandez v. Texas, was argued before the Supreme Court and challenged systemic, rampant discrimination against Mexican Americans. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH
Viewing of Hispanic Hollywood: Then and Now, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
An examination of the contributions of Hispanic performers in American cinema, as well as the evolving representation of the Hispanic subject in Hollywood film. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH
Second viewing of Hispanic Hollywood: Then and Now, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
 An examination of the contributions of Hispanic performers in American cinema, as well as the evolving representation of the Hispanic subject in Hollywood film. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6TH
Viewing of The Harvest [la Cosecha], a film by U. Roberto Romano, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. The Harvest/la Cosecha profiles these three as they journey from the scorching heat of Texas' onion fields to the winter snows of the Michigan apple orchards and back south to the humidity of Florida's tomato fields to follow the harvest. 

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH
Second viewing of The Harvest [la Cosecha], a film by U. Roberto Romano, with discussion
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., S370
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. The Harvest/la Cosecha profiles these three as they journey from the scorching heat of Texas' onion fields to the winter snows of the Michigan apple orchards and back south to the humidity of Florida's tomato fields to follow the harvest.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 12TH
Viewing of Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation, pt. V - Prejudice and Pride, with discussion.
1:00 – 3:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
In the 1960s and 1970s a generation of Mexican Americans, frustrated by persistent discrimination and poverty, find a new way forward, through social action and the building of a new "Chicano" identity. By the end of the 1970s Chicano activism and identity have transformed what it means to be an American. Chicano and Latino studies are incorporated into school curriculum; Latinos are included in the political process. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13TH
"When Political Discourse Goes Toxic: Lessons from the Holocaust and Contemporary Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric," panel discussion.
12:00 – 2:00 P.M., A300 Houston Room
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion; La Familia Vota; Holocaust Museum Houston
A panel discussion examining the disturbing parallels between anti-Semitic rhetoric in pre-WWII Germany and anti-(Hispanic)immigrant rhetoric in the United States today.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15TH
Viewing of Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation, pt. VI - Peril and Promise, with discussion.
1:00 to 3:00 P.M., N420
Host: Center for Diversity & Inclusion
Latinos present a challenge and an opportunity for the United States. America's largest and youngest growing sector of the population presents what Professor Marta Tienda calls, The Hispanic Moment. Their success could determine the growth of the United States in the twenty-first century; however their failure, contributing to an underclass, could also pull this country down. The key, according to Tienda and Eduardo J. Padron, Ph.D., President of Miami Dade Community College, is education.

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Last updated 9/11/2020 10:09 AM