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UHD Undergraduate Academic Programs - College of Sciences and Technology

J. Akif Uzman, PhD, Interim Dean
Ermelinda Delavina, PhD, Associate Dean
N723, 713-221-8019

 

The College of Sciences and Technology provides intellectual discipline and academic experiences essential to a sound edu­cation. It offers degrees to prepare students to enter profession­al schools, technical and scientific careers, graduate study and research. The college offers undergraduate courses and pro­grams in the Biological and Physical Sciences, Mathematical and Computer Sciences, and Engineering Technology. The degree programs offer opportunities for specialization as well as breadth.

 

The College of Sciences and Technology places the highest emphasis on quality instruction throughout its programs. Bringing the leading edge of science and technology into the classroom is a major goal that the faculty accomplishes by remaining current and active in their fields of specialization. The UHD Scholars Academy is designed to encourage more students to pursue and complete undergrad­uate degree programs in computer science, engineering technology, mathematics, and the natural sciences.

 

The College of Sciences and Technology also offers its students rare opportunities for undergraduate-level research. The Center for Applied Polymer Science Research, provides undergraduate students at UHD with the opportunity to participate directly in basic and applied polymer research projects that are of academic and industrial significance.  Other research opportunities are available through the Scholars Academy.

 

UHD Scholars Academy

Mary Jo Parker, EdD, Director
N725, 713 221-8471

 

The Scholars Academy is a competitive scholarship and mentoring program designed for students who want to major in Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering/Engineering Technology, and all areas of Natural Science, including pre-health programs (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, optometry, PA, pharmacy, veterinary). This competitive program is funded through various sources, such as The Brown Foundation, Inc., National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and UHD. Each Academy member receives a scholarship, which varies from $3,000 to $5,000 per academic year with additional opportunities for summer scholarships and also stipends for research participation. Students applying for admission to the Academy must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0; have a minimum SAT Math and Critical Reading scores of 500 each (for high school applicants); and be enrolled full-time and majoring in one of the degree programs within the UHD College of Sciences and Technology.

 

Programs of Study

The College offers degree programs leading to:


Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences with major in:
    Safety Management


Bachelor of Arts with major in:
    Mathematics
    Mathematics with Secondary Mathematics Teacher Certification


Bachelor of Science with majors in:
Mathematics
Applied Statistics
Applied Statistics with Biostatistics Concentration
Biological and Physical Sciences
Biology
Biotechnology
Chemistry
Computer Science


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology with majors in:
Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology*
Fire Protection Engineering Technology
Structural Analysis Design Option in Engineering Technology*

*Accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission ; ABET,Inc.,111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, :Telephone:  410374-7700, email: accreditation@abet.org; website http://abet.org

General Degree Requirements

 

General Education Requirements
All students seeking a bachelor’s degree at the University of Houston-Downtown must complete the general education requirements including the common core cours­es, the application courses, and enhancement courses. Fulfillment of general education requirements may vary depending on the degree.

 

Prerequisites
Registration for any course offered by the College of Sciences and Technology that has a course prerequisite must be author­ized by an advisor. Students may be dropped from any class for which they lack a prerequisite or a co-requisite. A course that is a prerequisite or co-requisite for another course may not be dropped unless the student drops both courses.

 

Transfer Credits
The department chair in consultation with department faculty will determine the applicability of transfer credits into specific degree
programs.

 

Computer and Mathematical Sciences
Department

 

Shishen Xie, PhD, Chair
S705, 713-221-8012

 

Faculty


Professors:

Barnes, Becerra, Berrached, DeLaViña, Lin, London, Sirisaengtaksin, Turski, Waller , Xie, Yoon

Associate Professors:

Chan, Hodgess, Jegdic, Leveille, Oberhoff, Pepper, Redl, Simeonov, Tecarro, Vobach,  Yuan,  Zafiris

Assistant Professors:

Cui, Hrynkiv, Koshkin, Mhoon, Quander, Shastri

Lecturers:

Baker, Beane, Blumberg, Gad, John, Nakamura, Nguyen, Simmons, Singh, Solomon

Emeriti: 

Freeman, DeKorvin

 

Academic Areas: Computer science, mathematics, statistics


Programs of Study

 

Bachelor of Arts with major in:
Mathematics
Mathematics with Secondary Mathematics Teacher Certification

 

Bachelor of Science with majors in:
Mathematics
Applied Statistics
Applied Statistics with Biostatistics Concentration
Computer Science

 

The Computer and Mathematical Sciences degree programs are structured to develop written and oral communication skills, to provide broad-based studies in the mathematical sciences, and to provide a selection of advanced course work in comput­er science, mathematics and/or applied statistics.

 

The degree programs in the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences provide students with an education responsive to the expanding uses of mathematical and computer techniques in business, government and industry. In addition, they provide the foundation for those students interested in pursuing graduate degrees, as well as those students interested in pursuing careers in education. Thus, they are designed to permit students to select courses suited to a variety of interests and career goals. In achieving these objectives, advising plays an important role and consequently each student is assigned an advisor to assist with the student’s schedule and career planning. The departmental Academic Screening Committee periodically evaluates academic progress by depart­mental majors, and students are advised appropriately.

 

Undergraduate training in the mathematical sciences has under­gone substantial change during the past decade. This change has been driven by advances and developments in the computer field and the expanding use of computers in business, government and industry. Growing demands exist for professional applied mathe­matical scientists. These individuals should have a solid background in basic mathematics, an understanding of advanced programming languages as well as advanced software techniques, and a mastery of important techniques in applied mathematics such as operations research and statistics. Virtually all industrial, business and govern­mental environments need individuals with these qualifications.

 

Those whose interests lie in the administrative or managerial sciences are especially valuable in market forecasting, computer-based accounting systems, industrial control, management training programs and long-range planning decisions. Those with an inter­est in statistics are valuable to firms that deal with large amounts of data, such as banking and insurance companies, which need per­sonnel to develop and maintain the associated software.

 

General Requirements for Graduation

 

All degree candidates must have a 2.0 GPA average and a grade of “C” or better in all Computer and Mathematical Sciences course work. Transfer grades of “D” are not accepted by the department. Any course substitutions or waivers must be approved by the department chair.

 

Students who complete the requirements of the University College are accepted for advising into the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences after they complete MATH 1301 College Algebra with a grade of “C” or better.

 

To declare a major in the department, students must satisfy:  TSI complete or exempt; 30 hours with 6 hours or more at UHD, or 60 transfer hours; “C” or better in MATH 1301; “D” or better in ENG 1302; and GPA of 2.0 or better. Policies regarding the degree pro­grams are printed on the program sheets distributed by the department. In compliance with the accrediting principles of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the busi­ness content of non-business programs is limited to no more than 25 percent of the hours prescribed for graduation.

 

Students are responsible for meeting the requirements for graduation. Therefore, students should become familiar with the requirements listed in this Catalog and their degree plan and should refer to them each time they plan their semester program of study.

 

The last 25% (30 hours) of the semester credit hours of course work toward the degree must be taken at the University of Houston-Downtown. A minimum of 18 semester hours of upper-level credit in CMS courses must be completed at UHD. Students who wish to take courses at another college or university, including any other campus of the University of Houston System, and apply the credits earned toward their degree must request approval through the department that administers their program before taking the course. Courses taken without such approval may not be counted toward the fulfillment of the degree requirements.

 

Bachelor of Arts
Majors in Mathematics, or Mathematics with Secondary Teacher Certification

 

Mathematics Major (120 hours)

 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics is designed to provide students with the foundation of a liberal arts education and a broad overview of modern mathematics and its applications, while also emphasizing the power, depth, and beauty inherent in the subject. The mathematical component of this plan is designed to prepare students to develop and use analytical and problem-solving skills, to master mathematical techniques required in related fields of application, and to enter the employment market with relevant and proficient mathematical tools. This degree offers many features to enhance a student’s educational experience: the choice of an approved university minor or concentration; sustained development of writing and speaking proficiency; and extended general education requirements that permit more study of the liberal arts. The BA degree is especially appropriate for students who wish to combine an extensive study of mathematics with a second concentration in such fields as arts, humanities, education, business, or the social sciences. It will help prepare students for various graduate or professional programs including mathematics, medicine and law. A student of this program, after completing the courses listed in the Mathematics Core, may then choose mathematics electives that seem most suitable to their interests.  Several suggested tracks are given with recommended electives. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors for further suggestions about which electives are most suitable, based on their goals and preferences.  The degree requires a minimum of 120 semester credit hours as indicated below. No grade of “D” in any course in the CMS Department may be applied toward satisfying the requirements of any degree in the department. Any course substitution must be approved by the department chair. The format of the degree is given in seven sections: General Education Requirements, Mathematics Requirements, Enhancement Course Requirement, Computer Science Requirements, Humanities Requirements, Minor or Concentration, and Free Electives.

 

General Education and Core Requirements
Additional General Education Requirements:
MATH  2405 satisfies the analytical skills requirement of the General Education program. CS 1408 or CS 1410 satisfy the Computer Literacy requirements in the Common Core. Math 3307 and Math 4395 satisfy the writing skills requirements.

 

Enhancement Course Requirement (2-3 hours)
At least one of: PHIL 2305,  PHIL 3301, MATH 4294.

 

Computer Science Requirement (4 hours)
CS 1408 or CS 1410

 

Mathematical Sciences Requirements (46 hours)
MATH 2401, 2402, 2403, 2405, 2407, 3301, 3302, 3306, 3307, 4395, and 15 additional hours of  mathematical sciences courses with at least nine additional hours at the 4000 level.  This  must include at least one of Math 3308, Math 3309, or Math 3312, and  at least one of Math 4304, 4306 or 4307. Students of this degree may not count MATH 3321 or MATH 3322 towards these requirements.

Humanities Requirements (6 hours)

  • Visual and Performing Arts - ART, DRA, MUS
  • Political and Social Sciences - ECO, GEOG, HIST, PHIL, POLS
  • Behavioral Sciences – ANTH, PSY, SOC
  • English and Speech – ENG, COMM
  • Languages – FREN, SPAN

 

Minor (18 approved hours minimum)
Any university-approved minor will satisfy this requirement, or secondary teacher certification in mathematics. Students seeking secondary teacher certification should complete a formal application in the Urban Education Department.
Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours total)

 

Mathematics Major with Mathematics Secondary Teacher Certification (120 hours)

 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics is designed to provide students with the foundation of a liberal arts education and a broad overview of modern mathematics and its applications, while also emphasizing the power, depth, and beauty inherent in the subject. This degree plan is specifically designed for students who intend to teach High School Mathematics. Therefore, the Urban Education Concentration is required.

 

The mathematical component of this plan is designed to prepare students to develop and use analytical and problem-solving skills, to master mathematical techniques required in related fields of application, and to enter the employment market with relevant and proficient mathematical tools. This degree offers many features to enhance a student’s educational experience: an approved university concentration; sustained development of writing and speaking proficiency. It will help prepare students for various graduate or professional programs including mathematics and mathematics education. A student of this program, after completing the courses listed in the Mathematics Core, may then choose mathematics electives that seem most suitable to their interests.  Several suggested tracks are given with recommended electives. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors for further suggestions about which electives are most suitable, based on their goals and preferences. 

 

The degree requires a minimum of 120 semester credit hours as indicated below. No grade of “D” in any course in the CMS Department may be applied toward satisfying the requirements of any degree in the department. Any course substitution must be approved by the department chair. The format of the degree is given in five sections: General Education Requirements, Mathematics Requirements, Computer Science Requirements, Urban Education Concentration, and Free Electives.

 

General Education and Core Requirements (44 hours)
Additional General Education Requirements:
MATH  2405 satisfies the analytical skills requirement of the General Education program. CS 1408 or CS 1410 satisfy the Computer Literacy requirements in the Common Core. Math 3307 and PED 4382 satisfy the writing skills requirements.

 

Computer Science Requirement
CS 1408 or CS 1410

 

Mathematical Sciences Requirements (43 hours)
MATH 2401, 2402, 2403, 2405, 2407, 3301, 3302, 3306, 3307, PED 4382, Math 3303, 3313, and 9 additional hours of  mathematical sciences courses with at least six additional hours at the 4000 level.  This  must include at least one of Math 3308, Math 3309, or Math 3312, and at least one of Math 4304, 4306 or 4307.  Math 4312 is strongly encouraged.. Students of this degree may not count MATH 3321 or MATH 3322 towards these requirements.

 

Urban Education Concentration (33 approved hours minimum)
Students seeking secondary teacher certification complete a formal application in the Urban Education Department at least one semester prior to taking PED 3305.

 

Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours total)

Bachelor of Science

Majors in Mathematics, Applied Statistics, Applied Statistics with Biostatistics Concentration, and Computer Science

Mathematics Major (120 hours)

 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics offers students a broad overview of modern mathematics and its applications, while also emphasizing the power, depth, and beauty inherent in the subject. The mathematical component of this plan is designed to prepare students to develop and use analytical and problem-solving skills, to master mathematical techniques required in related fields of application, and to enter the employment market with relevant and proficient mathematical tools. This degree offers many features to enhance a student’s educational experience: the choice of an approved university minor or concentration; sustained development of writing and speaking proficiency; and extended general education requirements that permit more study of the natural sciences. The BS degree is especially appropriate for students who wish to combine an extensive study of mathematics with a second concentration in one of the natural sciences, computer science, statistics, or engineering. It will help prepare students for various graduate or professional programs including mathematics, engineering, and finance. A student of this program, after completing the courses listed in the Mathematics Core, may then choose mathematics electives that seem most suitable to their interests.  Several suggested tracks are given with recommended electives. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors for further suggestions about which electives are most suitable, based on their goals and preferences.

 

General Education and Core Requirements
Additional General Education Requirements: Eight hours of lab sciences are required and must be in the same natural science and be approved by the department: MATH 2405 satisfies the analytical skills requirement of the General Education program.
CS 1410 satisfies the Computer Literacy requirement in the Common Core. Math 3307 and Math 4395 satisfy the writing skills requirements.

 

Enhancement Course Requirement (2-3 hours)
At least one of: PHIL 2305,  PHIL 3301, MATH 4294.

 

Computer Science Requirement (4 hours)
CS 1410

 

Mathematical Sciences Requirements  (46 hours)
MATH 2401, 2402, 2403, 2405, 2407, 3301, 3302, 3306,  3307, 4395, and15 additional hours of mathematical sciences courses with at least nine additional hours at the 4000 level.  This  must include at least one of Math 3308, Math 3309, or Math 3312, and  at least one of Math 4304, 4306 or 4307. Students of this degree may not count MATH 3321 or MATH 3322 towards these requirements.

 

Natural Science Requirements (6 hours)
In addition to the eight hours of lab sciences from the General Education and Core Requirements, six additional hours of approved natural science classes are required

 

Minor (18 approved hours minimum)
Any university-approved minor will satisfy this requirement.

Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours total)

Applied Statistics Major (120 hours)

 

The curriculum in Applied Statistics is structured to allow students to be employed in areas requiring the tools of discrete mathematics and statistics. The advent of high-speed computers and technological advances being made in this area has encouraged the development of, and has resulted in, important advances that constitute significant statistical tools for such areas as the life sciences, administrative/managerial sciences and the social/behavioral sciences.

 

General Education and Core Requirements
Additional general education requirements for students major­ing in Statistics are: ENG 3302; PHIL 3304; COMM 1304. Eight hours of lab sciences are required and must be in the same natural science and approved by the department. MATH 2405satisfies the analytical skills requirement of the General Education program. The writing skills requirement may be met by taking ENG 3302 and one of the following: STAT/MATH /CS4395; STAT 4300; STAT 4303; STAT 4307; STAT 4309; STAT 4310 and STAT 4306.

 

Mathematical Sciences Requirements (41 hours)
CS 1408 or CS 1410, MATH 1305, 1306, ,2405 2407, CS/MATH/STAT 4294, 4395 (or approved W course), STAT 3309, 3310, and four courses chosen from STAT 4306,  STAT 4311; STAT 4300, 4303, 4307, 4309, 4310. The sequence MATH 2401, MATH 2402, MATH 3302 may be substituted for MATH 1305, MATH 1306, STAT 3309,

 

Minor (18 hours minimum)
Any university-approved minor will satisfy this requirement.

 

Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours)

 

Applied Statistics Major with Biostatistics Concentration (120 hours)

 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Statistics with concentration in Biostatistics is designed to provide students with a broad overview of statistics and its applications in biological sciences. This degree plan is specifically designed for students who intend to be employed in life and health sciences requiring statistical tools. The mathematical component of this plan is designed to prepare students to develop and use analytical and problem-solving skills, to master mathematical techniques and to enter the employment market with relevant and proficient statistical tools. This degree plan offers many features to enhance a student’s educational experience: the required natural sciences component provides students with knowledge and understanding in biological sciences; the application of statistics in biological sciences; and sustained development of writing and speaking proficiency. It will help prepare students for various graduate or professional programs in statistics and biostatistics. A student of this program may also seek career opportunities in health science, bioinformatics, pharmaceutical industries and other life and environmental sciences. Pre-med students having completed this concentration can fulfill TMDSAS undergraduate course requirements for Texas medical and dental school admission if they choose the courses designated with * among their electives. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors for further suggestions about which electives are most suitable, based on their goals and preferences. The degree requires a minimum of 120 semester credit hours as indicated below. No grade of “D” in any course in mathematical, computer and natural sciences may be applied toward satisfying the degree requirements. Any course substitution must be approved by the department chair. The format of the degree is given in five sections: General Education Requirements, Mathematical Sciences Requirements, Computer Science Requirements, Natural Science Requirements and Free Electives.

 

General Education Requirements
Additional general education requirements: BIOL 1301/1101 and 1302/1102 satisfies the lab sciences requirement; MATH 2405 satisfies the analytical skills requirement.

 

Mathematical Sciences Requirements (40 - 42 hours)
MATH 2405, 2407 and one of the three sequences: MATH 2401 and 2402; or MATH 2411 and 2412; or MATH 1305 and 1306. STAT 3311, 4318, 4397, 4294, 4395 and twelve additional hours of upper level Statistics electives chosen from the following: STAT 4300, 4303, 4306, 4307, 4309, 4310, or 4311.

 

Computer Science Requirement (4 hours)
CS 1408 or 1410

 

Natural Sciences Requirements (28 hours)
BIOL 1301/1101, BIOL 1302/1102, CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108, MBIO 2305/2105, BIOL 3303/3103, and twelve additional hours of upper level Biology or Chemistry electives chosen from the following: BIOL 4303, BIOL 3306, BIOL 3302/3102, BIOL 3320/3120, BIOL 4260 and BIOL 4360, BIOL 4220, BIOL 3300, CHEM* 3301/3201 and CHEM* 3302/3202, or any upper level BIOL, CHEM and MBIO courses approved by the Natural Sciences Department.

 

Enhanced Writing Skills Requirement
The writing skills requirement may be met by taking STAT 4395, and one additional 4000 level Statistics course which is an approved writing course or ENG 3302.

 

Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours). *Pre-med students should take PHYS 1307/1107 and PHYS 1308/1108 as electives.

 

Computer Science Major (120 hours)

 

The Computer Science program in the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences at UH-Downtown offers students a strong foundation in the fundamental concepts of computer sci­ence combined with sound practical training relevant to the common applications of computing in business and industry. The Bachelor of Science degree provides preparation for all career paths in computer science and information technology, including database systems, scientific computing and simulation, graphics, artificial intelligence, software engineering, and net­working and telecommunications. By emphasizing broad-based studies including mathematics and science requirements, the student’s choice of an approved university minor, and sustained development of writing and speaking proficiency, the degree furnishes students with the problem solving and communication skills that are in high demand in today’s job market and gradu­ate schools. Possessing many areas of expertise, the computer science faculty shares UHD’s commitment to quality teaching in a challenging yet personal and supportive learning environ­ment. This commitment helps our majors compete successfully for positions involving the use and support of current computer applications, as well as for positions designing and building the computer applications of tomorrow.

 

General Education and Core Requirements
Additional general education requirements for students major­ing in Computer Science are ENG 3302 and COMM 1304. Eight hours of lab sciences are required and must be in the same natural science and be approved by the department. MATH 2405 satisfies the analytical skills requirement of the General Education program. The writing skills requirement may be met by taking ENG 3302 and one of the following W courses: CS 4395;CS 4319, CS 4325, CS 4326, CS 4328.

 

Mathematics Requirements (  19  hours)
MATH 2405, 2407, 2401, 2402, and 3302.

 

Computer Science Requirements (52 hours)
CS 1410, 2401, 2402, 2410, 3304, 3306, 3420, 4294, 4303, 4315, 4318, and 4395 (or approved W course). In addition,
12 hours of computer science electives must be completed, at least 9 of which must be 3000 or 4000-level; 3 hours may be 1000 or 2000-level above CS 1305.

 

Electives (sufficient hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours total)

 

Minor Programs

 

Minor in Mathematics ( 18 hours minimum)
Math 2401-2402 or Math 2411-2412, plus at least 6 hours of upper level math electives (excluding Math 3321 and Math 3322), such as to total at least 18 hours of mathematics courses.
Three example sequences of courses that students of this program might take are:
Math 2401                               Math 2401                               Math 2411
Math 2402                               Math 2402                               Math 2412
Math 3301                               Math 2405                               Math 2407
Math 2407                               Math 3309                               Math 3301
Math 3308                               Math 4308                               Math 3302
(Engineering)               (Computer Science)         (Biology or Chemistry)

Minor in Applied Statistics (18 hours minimum)
The sequence of MATH 1305, MATH 1306, STAT 3309
or
The sequence of MATH 2401, MATH 2402, MATH 3302
Nine hours from:
STAT 3310
STAT 4300
STAT 4303
STAT 4306
STAT 4307
STAT 4309
STAT 4310
STAT 4311
Six of the upper level hours must be completed at UHD.
All hours counted toward the minor must be “C” or better.

 

Minor in Bioinformatics
BIO 1301/1101, BIO 3303/3103, CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108, CS 1410, CS 2410, CS 3304, CS 4318, and two courses from: CS 4328, CS 4319, or any approved upper-level CS course.  All hours counted toward the minor must be passed with “C” or better. At least 6 hours of upper-level course work in the minor must be completed at the University of Houston-Downtown. Students majoring in an area of the natural sciences, computer science or mathematics should choose courses in consultation with their academic advisor.

 

Minor in Computer Science (20 hours minimum)
CS 1410
CS 2410
Six hours beyond CS 1305
Six hours of upper-level Computer Science. The six upper level hours must be completed at UHD.
All hours counted toward the minor must be “C” or better.

For all minors:
•   All hours counted toward the minor must be passed with “C” or better.
•   At least 6 hours of upper-level course work in the minor must be completed at the University of Houston-Downtown

 

Honors Program in the Computer and Mathematical Sciences

To enhance the educational opportunities and experiences of the academically talented students at UH-Downtown, the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences offers an Honors Program. The program is designed to challenge and motivate students to do more than the minimum required for a particular degree. Students who successfully complete this pro­gram will be designed as graduates of an Honors Program in the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences on their diploma and university transcript.

 

Admission Requirements:
•   Application to the department’s Honors Program Admission and Review Committee
•   Completion of at least 60 semester credit hours of recognized university-level work
•   An overall GPA of at least 3.0 with a GPA of 3.25 or better in CMS courses
•   Completion of at least 16 semester credit hours in CMS cours­es, eight of which must have been taken at UH-Downtown.

 

Program Requirements:
•   Satisfy the requirements for one of the department’s Bachelor of Science degree programs
•   Complete at least two honors designated courses in addition to three hours of credit in Senior Honor Thesis. The Senior Thesis will be done under the supervision of an approved member of UHD faculty and will be presented in both oral and written form to the CMS faculty.
•   Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.25 in all CMS courses including the required honors courses.
•   Maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better in all courses outside the CMS Department taken at UH-Downtown.

 

The department Honors Program Admissions and Review Committee must approve all honors designated courses and all projects proposed by students for their honors theses. Upper-level courses designated as Honors require at least 25 percent more in-depth study than that required of students taking the course without honors credit. The additional course require­ments will vary depending on the course
instructor.

 

Mathematics Certification Program

In addition to the degree programs, the CMS Department offers, in conjunction with the Urban Education Department, a bachelor of science in Applied Mathematics with mathematics certification or a bachelor of arts in Mathematics with mathematics certification.

 

Pi Mu Epsilon
The Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences is privileged to have a chapter of the prestigious honorary mathe­matics society Pi Mu Epsilon. The name of our chapter is Texas Nu. The mission of the society is to encourage and promote mathematics. Each year the Pi Mu Epsilon coordinators invite students who have shown exceptional abilities in the mathemati­cal sciences to join the chapter. In addition, the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences is also privileged to have student chapters of the presti­gious organizations: The Mathematical Association of America and the Association of Computing Machinery.

 

Engineering Technology Department

 

Kenneth Oberhoff, PhD, Interim Chair
N738, 713-221-8089

 

Faculty

 

Professors

Pincus

Associate Professors

Feng, Sheinberg, Tito-Izquierdo

Assistant Professor
Lecturer

Tzouanas
Condello


Programs of Study

 

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences with major in:
Safety Management

 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology with majors in:
Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology (CIET)*
Structural Analysis /Design  Option in Engineering Technology (SAD)*
    *Accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission ; ABET,Inc.,111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, :Telephone:  410-374-7700, email: accreditation@abet.org; website http://abet.org

 

Mission and Objectives
The Engineering Technology Department strives to provide high quality engineering technology degree programs and unique curricula for students from diverse social, educational, and eth­nic backgrounds. The department is committed to maintaining an educational environment in which students can significantly enhance their academic standing as well as their skills in com­puting, problem-solving, communication, and teamwork. With a strong sense of professionalism, students are trained to become successful individuals who are socially responsible and profes­sionally competitive.

 

The Engineering Technology curricula reflect the demands and requirements of industries and businesses in the greater Houston area. The close partnerships forged between the department and local industries ensure that our academic programs are dynamic and up-to-date. Such partnerships also benefit gradu­ates when they seek
employment.

 

Our academic programs include solid foundation courses in the basic sciences, mathematics, and applied engineering together with a strong emphasis in computer applications. Courses in PC applications in engineering and analysis of engineering networks are included in the curricula of all Engineering Technology pro­grams to promote the philosophy of productivity. Design-oriented semester projects embedded in technological courses give students ample opportunities to gain practical experience, and to prepare themselves to be productive engineering technolo­gists after graduation.

 

The Department provides an innovative teaching and learning environment. Classroom lecturing is typically combined with laboratory experiments and computer simulations. The degree programs aim to empower students with lifelong learning and continuous improvement capabilities. Members of the faculty are committed to providing extended support to students’ learn­ing activities both inside and outside the classroom. The faculty’s open-door policy and flexible class scheduling accommodate the needs of working students. The exis­tence within the Department of a number of student chapters of professional organizations promotes networking, career awareness and planning opportunities. Special scholarships are available to promote excellence in academics, service, and leadership. Students and faculty in the Engineering Technology Department also have the opportunity to participate in undergraduate research sponsored by the Scholars Academy.

 

Student Sections
American Concrete Institute (ACI)
International Society of Automation (ISA)
Society of Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE)

 

Facilities
The modern laboratory facilities in the Engineering Technology Department provide students with ample opportunities for hands-on practice. The laboratories are:
•   Structures, Concrete Technology and Soil Mechanics Laboratory (sponsored by NSF)
•   GPS–GIS Laboratory
•   Electronics Laboratories
•   Control and Instrumentation Laboratory

 

These labs are equipped with materials, equipment, instruments, computers, and various industrial standard design and application software tools.

 

Semester Projects
In order to fulfill the accreditation requirements of TAC of ABET, all courses in the Engineering Technology Department include semester projects.  The purpose of the project is to train students to work on real-industry problems in the team environment that they will encounter working in industry after graduation.

Advising

For information about requirements for admission to Engineering Technology degree programs, declaration of major, transferability of courses, and requirements for graduation, please contact the department office in Room 738-North, or phone 713-221-8089.

 

Declaring a Major
You can declare an Engineering Technology degree program as your major when you have completed at least 30 hours of college-level coursework, fulfilled all of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) obligations, have a GPA of at least 2.0, and have completed MATH 1301 (College Algebra) and currently enrolled in or completed ENG 1302 (Composition II).  You must also be currently enrolled at UHD and have no holds on your academic record.  After you declare your major you will be able to see an advisor in the appropriate major..

 

Engineering Technology faculty will recommend courses and pro­vide course sequence guidelines to ensure that students make smooth progress toward completion of degree requirements. Faculty members also provide information regarding career opportunities and other development opportunities.

 

When a student is accepted into an Engineering Technology degree program, the department prepares a computerized official degree plan and makes it available for review by the student. The student’s degree plan serves as a basic advising document used by the department faculty. In order to facilitate advising during registration, students should bring an electronic copy of their degree plan.

 

Requirements for Graduation
The requirements for graduation with an Engineering Technology major comply with the UHD policy on graduation requirements. In addition, the students should complete all the requirements list­ed for the specific degree program. It is the students’ responsibili­ty to become familiar with the requirements listed in this Catalog and in their degree plan, and the students should refer to them each time they plan their semester program of study. All degrees in the department require a grade of “C” or better in all engineering technology  (ENGR, ET, and EET) courses.

Courses of Instruction
All courses of instruction are offered at least once each academ­ic year, including summer. Careful planning is required in order for a student to complete a specific degree plan within shortest period of time.

 

Minor in Engineering Technology
The Engineering Technology minor is offered to provide specific engineering knowledge and skills to students pursuing degrees in other fields such business, humanities, or the sciences, and also to enhance the employment prospects of students enrolled in non-technical majors. Laboratories associated with our courses give students hands-on skills in the use of up-to-date equipment, laboratory devices, and instruments. The minor can be cus­tomized to meet the needs of the student and to complement the student’s academic background. Course requirements shall include 20 semester credit hours in Engineering Technology courses with a limit of 12 credit hours transferred from other institutions. Course grades in the Engineering Technology minor must be “C” or better. Credit for Field Experience cannot apply.

 

Sample Requirements
•   Sample for students pursuing the BBA, major in Purchasing & Materials Management or Bachelor of Science, major in Computer Science:
ENGR 1302, ENGR 1400, ENGR 2407 , ENGR 3302, and six hours of upper level engineering technology courses chosen in consultation with Engineering Technology advisor.

 

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences

Safety Management (120 hours)


Edward R. Sheinberg, MME, Coordinator
N706, 713-221-8441
Students enrolled in the Safety Management program will be exposed to the human and equipment aspects of safety.  They will also be trained in the ability to absorb new technologies generated from industry. The Engineering Technology Department will develop personnel able to apply the most modern technologies to assure the safety operation of current enterprises.  As such, the program produces graduates who   have a sound foundation in safety management, management of organizations, human factors, domestic terrorism, and industrial safety, hygiene and loss prevention are all-around individuals with strong social skill, able to work in team environments, competent in communication and information presentation, and with a strong sense of professionalism;  are committed to continuous improvement and lifelong learning.

 

The BAAS degree is intended for recipients of the AAS degree awarded by community or junior colleges. These programs extend for 4 or more semesters and include 60 semester credit hours, although some programs include additional semester hours.
The degree requires a grade of “C” or better in all engineering technology (ENGR, ET, and EET) courses.

 

General Education Core Requirements
ENG 1301           Composition I
ENG 1302           Composition II
HIST 1305           US History to 1877
HIST 1306           US History after 1877
COMM 1304       Introduction to Speech Communication
MATH 1301         College Algebra
POLS 2303         US Government I
POLS 2304         US Government II
Literature (three hours)
Natural Sciences (six hours)
Fine Arts (three hours)
Social/Behavioral Sciences (three hours)
Computer Literacy (three hours)

Other Basic Requirements

ENG 3302 Business & Tech Report  Writing

 

Safety Management Requirements
Lower Division
18 hours of Approved Electives

Upper Division
ENGR 3320        Principles of Fire Protection Chemistry and Physics
ENGR 3330        Fire Alarm Signaling Systems
ENGR 3346        Offshore Fire and Safety Inspection
ENGR 3350        Construction Safety
ENGR 3365        Fire Protection for Power Plants
ENGR 3370        Fire Protection Law
ENGR 3375        Radiation Safety
ENGR 3380        Occupational Safety Techniques
ENGR 4310        Industrial Hygiene Instrumentation
ENGR 4330        Systems Safety Management
ENGR 4350        Industrial Loss Prevention
ENGR 4355        Industrial Safety
ENGR 4370        Human Factors in Fire and Safety
ENGR 4381        Safety and Violence 
ENGR 4385        Scheme Management in Industrial Safety
    ET 4323              Technology Seminar

 

Upper Electives (9  hours, Approved by advisor)

 

For the General Education Program, ENG 3302 and ET 4323 satisfy the writing (W) application course requirement.  ET 4323 also satisfies the application skills (S) requirement  and the enhancement course requirement.

 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology

Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology (125 hours)

 

*The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology  program in Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission ; ABET,Inc.,111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, :Telephone:  410-374-7700, email: accreditation@abet.org; website http://abet.org

Weining Feng, PhD, Coordinator
N708, 713-221-8591

 

The main focus of the Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology degree program is the application of com­puter technology and modern electronics to industrial process control and instrumentation systems. As such, the program pro­duces graduates who:
•   have a sound foundation in the analysis, design, testing, and implementation of instrumentation and control systems;
•   are proficient in applying their knowledge (in mathematics, sciences, and engineering), and standard tools, especially computer software and hardware tools, to technical prob­lem solving;
•   are all-around individuals with strong social skills, able to work in team environments, competent in communication and information presentation, and with a strong sense of professionalism;
•   are committed to continuous improvement and lifelong learning.
Control and instrumentation engineering technology has its basis in comput­er technology, electrical/electronics systems and communication systems. Control and instrumentation specialists are among the most sought-after personnel in the Houston area due to the growing demand from process industries (petrochemical and oil refin­ing), power companies, and energy industries. The broad technical background of control and instru­mentation graduates opens up bright employment prospects.

 

General Requirements for Graduation in Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology (CIET)

In addition to UHD general requirements for graduation, the CIET division of the Engineering Technology Department requires that all candidates pursuing a degree in CIET can have no more than two grades of “D” in Math, Physics, and Chemistry.    All engineering technology  (ENGR, ET, and EET)  courses must be completed with a grade of  “C” or better..

 

General Education Core Requirements
ENGR 1400                        PC Applications in Engineering
ENG 1301                           Composition I
ENG 1302                           Composition II
HIST 1305                           US History to 1877
HIST 1306                           US History after 1877
MATH 2401                         Calculus I
PHYS 1307/1107                General Physics I with Lab
PHYS 1308/1108                General Physics II with Lab
POLS 2303 US                   Government I
POLS 2304 US                   Government II
COMM 1304                       Introduction to Speech Communication /Social /Behavioral Sciences (three hours)
Fine Arts (three hours)
Literature (three hours

Control and Instrumentation Engineering Technology
Requirements

Lower Division
MATH 2402         Calculus II,
or
ENGR 2411        Modern Methods of Engineering Analysis
CHEM 1307/1107 General Chemistry with Lab
ENGR 1302        Engineering and Technology Fundamentals
EET 1411            Electric Circuits with Lab
ENGR  2410       Analysis of Engineering Networks with Lab
EET 2421            Electronic Devices and Amplifiers with Lab
EET 2431            Digital Logic Design with Lab
Upper Division
ENG 3302           Business and Technical Report Writing
ENGR 3404        Digital Signal Processing with Lab
EET 3435            Fundamentals of Automation and Control with Lab
EET 3451            Instruments and Transducers with Lab
ENGR 3406        Process Control Systems with Lab
ENGR 3407        Industrial Robotics with Lab
EET 3334            Electrical Power Systems
ENGR 3302        Engineering Economics
ENGR 3410        Process Modeling and Simulation
ET 4323              Technology Seminar
EET 4335            Computer Networking
ENGR 4402        Process Design and Operation
ENGR 4328        Senior Project in Control and Instrumentation

 

Electives
Six  hours of electives selected in consultation with depart­ment
advisors.

 

For the General Education Program, ENG 3302 and ET 4323 satisfy the writing (W) application course requirement.  ET 4323 also satisfies the application skills (S) requirement  and the enhancement course requirement.

 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology

Structural Analysis/Design Option in Engineering Technology (120 hours)

*The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology  program in Structural Analysis/Design Option in  Engineering Technology is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission ; ABET,Inc.,111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, :Telephone:  410-374-7700, email: accreditation@abet.org; website http://abet.org

 

Jorge Tito, PhD, P.E., Coordinator
N707, 713-221-8440


The main focus of the Structural Analysis and Design Option in Engineering Technology program is the application of computer technology, modern materials and construction techniques to the overall design of structures, including project planning, costs estimates and management of the project. As such, the program will prepare graduates who have:
1. Have a sound background in the analysis, design, testing and construction of civil structures (bridges, buildings, and communication towers);
2. Are proficient in applying their knowledge (in mathematics, science and engineering) and standard tools, specially computer hardware and software, to technical problem solving.
3. Are all around individuals with strong social skill, able to work in team environments, competent in communication and information presentation, and with strong sense of professionalism and ethics.
4. Are productive from the first day in the work place and are committed to continuous improvement and lifelong learning. 
Structural analysis specialists are among the most sought-after personnel in the Houston area due to the growing demand from construction industries, power companies, transportation systems and energy industries. Structural analysis and design technology has its basis in computer technology, construction systems, and materials science. The broad technical background of structural analysis graduates opens up bright employment prospects, from construction industries to telecommunications and transportation systems.

 

General Requirements for Graduation in Structural Analysis /Design Option in Engineering Technology  (SAD)

In addition to UHD general requirements for graduation, the SAD division of the Engineering Technology Department requires that all candidates pursuing a degree in SAD can have no more than two grades of “D” in Math, Physics, and Chemistry.    All engineering technology  (ENGR, ET, and EET)  courses must be completed with a grade of  “C” or better..

 

General Education Core Requirements
ENGR 1400        PC Applications in Engineering
ENG 1301           Composition I
ENG 1302           Composition II
HIST 1305           US History to 1877
HIST 1306           US History after 1877
MATH 2401         Calculus I
PHYS 1307/1107 General Physics I with Lab
PHYS 1308/1108 General Physics II with Lab
POLS 2303         US Government I
POLS 2304         US Government II
COMM 1304       Introduction to Speech Communication
Social/Behavioral Science (3 hours)
Fine Arts (3 hours)
Literature (3 hours)

 

Structural Analysis/ Design Option in Engr. Tech. Requirements

Lower Division
CHEM 1307/1107 General Chemistry with Lab
ENGR 1302        Engineering and Technology Fundamentals
EET 1411            Electric Circuits with Lab
ENGR 2407        Surveying  with GIS-GPS
ENGR 2410        Analysis of Engineering Networks with Lab
ENGR 2411        Modern Methods of Engineering Analysis

Upper Division

ENG 3302           Business and Technical Report Writing
ENGR 3302        Engineering Economics
ENGR 3311        Structural Analysis
ENGR 3312        Reinforced Concrete Design
ET 3320              Modern Concrete Technology
ET 3321              Soil Mechanics
ET 3322              Finite Element Analysis of Structures
ET 4320              Prestressed Concrete
ET 4321              Structural Steel Design
ET 4322              Foundation Design
ET 4323              Technology Seminar
ET 4324              Senior Concrete Design Project  or ET 4325  Senior Steel Design Project
ENGR 3407        Industrial Robotics with Lab
ENGR 4326        Struct. Dynamic & Control
ENGR 4411        Structural Fire Safety or ENGR 4428 Structural    Construction
    ENGR 4420  Fire Dynamics or ENGR 4427 Structural Wood Design

For the General Education Program, ENG 3302 and ET 4323 satisfy the writing (W) application course requirement.  ET 4323 also satisfies the application skills (S) requirement  and the enhancement course requirement

 

Natural Sciences Department

 

Lisa Morano, PhD, Chair
N813, 713-221-8015

Tyra Hessel, PhD, Assistant Chair
N817, 713-221-8485

 

Faculty


Professors:

Christmas, Merrill, Morris-Smith, Uzman

Associate Professors:

Aoki, Benavides, Flosi, Grebowicz, Gulati, Hoge, Jiang, J. Johnson, K. Johnson, Lyons,
Hessel, Morano

Assistant Professors:

Baird, Bowden. Jose, Sadana, Sullender, Tobin, Trufan

Lecturers:

Brown, Ghoshal, Griffard, Idowu, Kang, Lang, Mouchaty, Musselwhite, Qavi, Parker, Sterna,

Emeriti:

Abramowitz, Avenoso, Fefer, Hoffmann-Pinther,  Price, Sherman, Umland

 

Academic Areas: biology, chemistry, geology, microbiology, physics

Pre-Professional Areas: clinical laboratory science, dental hygiene, dentistry, medicine, nutrition and dietet­ics, nursing, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physical thera­py, physician’s assistant, and veteri­nary medicine

Specialized Areas: environmental science and science education (see list of certification areas below).


Programs of Study

 

Bachelor of Science with majors in:
Biology
Biological and Physical Sciences
Biotechnology
Chemistry
Geosciences

The Department of Natural Sciences offers lower and upper-level courses in the academic and specialized areas listed above. In addition, it provides courses that serve a number of pre-professional areas. Students interested in biology may pursue the Bachelor of Science in Biology or Biotechnology. In addition to the standard Biology degree, students may choose to concentrate in Microbiology, Environmental Biosciences or Molecular and Cellular Biosciences.  Students interest­ed in chemistry may pursue the Bachelor of Science program in Chemistry with concentrations in Biochemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Forensic Science and Industrial Chemistry. Students may also seek the Bachelor of Science degree in the Biological and Physical Sciences which may be used for a variety of interests and can be easily combined with Teacher Certification. Students may also enroll in a BS in Geosciences with concentrations in Geochemistry, Petroleum Geotechnology or Environmental Geology.

 

Declaring a Major and Advising
Students who wish to officially declare a major in an area of natural science and be accepted into a degree program in the Department of Natural Sciences should have passed all portions of THEA and have a minimum grade point average of 2.0. All students accepted into the department will be assigned an advisor. The department’s Health Professions Advisory Committee will coor­dinate the advising of students interested in a particular health professions area. Students who wish to declare a major in sci­ence or one of the health-related areas should go to the depart­ment office in Room 813-North.

 

Drop Policy for Science Courses with Prerequisites/Co-requisites
Students must follow stated prerequisite/co-requisite listings for natural science courses. Students may be dropped from any class for which they lack a prerequisite or a co-requisite.  A student can drop a co-requisite course after mid-semester up to and including the last day to drop the course. The student would receive a W for the dropped course. The department will not allow graduation credit for a science course in which the student has not satisfactorily com­pleted any listed co-requisite.

 

General Requirements for Graduation
The Department of Natural Sciences has the following general requirements for all science degrees: (1) Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all science courses that could apply toward the degree; (2) No more than three credit hours with a grade of D in upper-level science courses may be applied toward the degree; (3) Students must have at least 18 credit hours of upper-level science from UH-Downtown with a minimum GPA of 2.0 to apply toward the degree; (4) Credit for science courses that are more than 10 years old must be approved by the department before they can be applied toward a degree; and (5) Students must complete an exit survey with an NS faculty member (see Department Office, N813).
Students are responsible for meeting the requirements for grad­uation. Therefore, students should become familiar with the requirements listed in their degree plan and should refer to them each time they plan their semester program of study.
The last 25% of the semester credit hours of work toward the degree must be taken at the University of Houston-Downtown. Students who wish to take courses at another college or univer­sity, including any other campus of the UH System, and apply the credits earned toward their degrees must request approval through the Natural Sciences Department. Courses taken with­out such approval may not be counted toward the fulfillment of degree requirements.

 

Requirements for Minors in Science
No upper-level courses with grades of D will be counted. No transfer credits with grades of D will be counted. Must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses applied to the minor. Students may bring 3-4 hours of upper-level credit from another institution, but the balance of upper-level credits (depending upon minor) must be taken at UH-Downtown. Upper-level courses must be taken at UH-Downtown. Credit for direct­ed studies, field experiences, honors thesis and undergraduate research cannot apply.

 

Bioinformatics:

22 hours: BIOL 3303/3103, MATH 3302
One course from BIOL 3302/3102, BIOL 4303,
BIOL 4320, BIOL 4330, CHEM 4340/4140.
At least two courses from CS/MATH 3308,
STAT/MATH 4306, CS 4328, CS/MATH 4333, CS/MATH 4399
At least two courses from MATH 3301, MATH
4315, MATH 4304, STAT 4307
Students majoring in an area of the natural sciences, computer science or mathematics should choose courses in consultation with their academic advisor.

Biology:

22 hours of biology with only eight hours at the
lower level: must include a minimum of four
three-contact hour laboratory courses.

Chemistry:

21 hours of chemistry: must include CHEM
1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201 and
eight hours of upper-level chemistry.

Environmental Sciences:

23 hours: BIOL 3302/3102; BIOL 3310/3110 or GEOL (e.g., GEOL 3410 or  petrology or stratigraphy related course) with approval of Environmental Science Coordinator; BIOL/CHEM 4260, or relevant BIOL/CHEM/GEOL 3300 with approval of Environmental Science Coordinator; Pick two: BIOL 4360, CHEM 3320, GEOL 3303, MBIO 3340; pick one: CHEM 3310/3110, GEOL 3340, GEOL 3410, or 4390 Special Topics course relevant to Environmental Science with approval of Environmental  Science Coordinator; pick one: ENG 3329, PHIL 3320, BA 3303.

Geology:

20 hours: must include GEOL 1405, 1406 and 12 hours of upper-level cours­es in geology.

Microbiology:

20 hours: must include BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, MBIO 2305/2105 and eight hours of upper-level microbiology.

Applied Physics:

20 hours: must include PHYS 2401/2101, 2402/2102 and three upper-level courses in physics.


Science Certification Programs

Jon Aoki, EdD, Coordinator
N725G, 713-221-8687

The Department of Natural Sciences, in cooperation with the Department of Urban Education, offers a full array of science certification programs for secondary-level education. These pro­grams satisfy the requirements established by the State Board for Educator Certification and Texas Education Agency. Detailed curriculum guides are available for each program in Room 813-North

Honors Program in the Natural Sciences

Poonam Gulati, PhD, Coordinator
N819, 713-221-8066

In order to enhance the educational opportunities and experi­ences of academically talented students at UH-Downtown, the Department of Natural Sciences offers an Honors Program in the Natural Sciences. The program is designed to challenge and moti­vate students to do more than the minimum required for a particu­lar degree in science. Students who successfully complete this pro­gram will be designated as graduates of an Honors Program in the Department of Natural Sciences on their university transcript.


Admission Requirements:
•   Application to the department’s Honors Program Admissions and Review Committee
•   Completion of at least 60 semester credit hours of recog­nized university-level work
•   An overall GPA of at least 3.0 with a GPA of 3.25 or better in science courses
•   Completion of at least 16 semester credit hours in science, eight of which must have been taken at UHD

 

Program Requirements:
•   Satisfy the requirements for one of the department’s Bachelor of Science degree programs
•   Complete one honors-designated course in addition to six hours credit in BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, MBIO, or PHYS 4399 Senior Honors Thesis. The senior thesis will be completed under the supervision of an approved member of the UHD faculty with input from the Honors Program Committee
•   Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.25 in all science courses including the required honors courses
•   Maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better in all non-science courses taken at UHD

 

The departmental Honors Program Admissions and Review Committee must approve all honors designated courses and all projects proposed by students for their honors theses. Upper-level courses designated as Honors require at least 25 percent more in-depth study than that required of students taking the course without honors credit. The additional course require­ments will vary depending on the course and instructor.

Bachelor of Science

Major in Biological and Physical Sciences (120 hours)


Ken Johnson, PhD, Coordinator
N822, 713-221-5375

 

The Bachelor of Science in Biological and Physical Sciences pro­vides both a broad-based curriculum in the liberal arts and a spe­cific set of courses in the natural sciences designed to meet the per­sonal and career goals and interests of the student. This degree is especially appropriate for students interested in multidisciplinary areas such as environmental science, earth/geological science, forensic science, life science, medical technology, public health, science education, and any health-related program that requires a bachelor’s degree for entry into a particular graduate program.  Students interested in careers in teaching can pursue the B.S. in Biological and Physical Sciences with Concentration in Teacher Certification.

 

Course Requirements for the Biological and Physical Sciences Major (120 hours) and Biological and Physical Sciences Major with Concentration in Teacher Certification (121 hours)

 

The approved degree plan for this program will be determined by consultation between the student, his or her advisor, and the department chair. A minimum of 120 hours of university-level course work is required. All general requirements for graduation in the Department of Natural Sciences apply to this degree.

Students in the BS in Biological and Physical Sciences with Concentration in Teacher Certification will be advised to take 16 hours of upper level science in one area (24 hours total in one area) so they can meet course requirements for teaching specialization in that area. 

 

General Education Requirements
All com­mon core requirements (math and science listed below) may be fulfilled by taking any of the courses listed as options outlined in the catalog.  The writing skills requirement is satisfied by the completion of two upper-level writing courses chosen from an approved list of courses available from the program coordinator, depart­mental office, or the department’s web page. The nonverbal analytical skills requirement is sat­isfied by many of the required natural sciences courses. The general education program's emphases on ethical and moral issues and the world community are addressed by taking one course in each area. A list of approved courses for these two requirements is available from the Department of Natural Sciences website, (under Degree Plans), program coordinator or the departmental office.

 

Lower-Level Science Requirements
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
MATH 1404
CS 1408 or 1410
Seven of the following lecture/laboratory courses:
BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108
GEOL 1405, 1406
PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108

 

Upper-Level Requirements
Forty-four hours, of which at least 22 hours must be in the natu­ral sciences, (biology, chemistry, geology, microbiology and applied physics) with a minimum grade point average in natural sci­ences courses of 2.0 or better. At least 18 of these hours must be taken at UHD.  At least 7-8 hours must be in 4000-level natural sciences lecture courses with at least one lab­oratory course. Field experience or thesis credit cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. No more than 3 credit hours in upper-level sciences with a grade of D.  For students working on the Concentration in Teacher Certification it is critical that they work with the advisor for this concentration so they may get all of the required 33 hours of education courses incorporated into their degree plan. 

 

Electives
At least 10 hours, at any level, chosen with advisor approval (at least 11 hours for Emphasis in Teacher Certification)
NOTE: Excluding the hours listed under “Lower-Level Science Requirements,” no more than 28 hours of natural sciences courses (biology, chemistry, geology, microbiology and applied physics) may be in a single discipline, and no more than 18 hours of the required upper-level science may be in a single discipline. This rule does not apply to BPS degrees with concentrations.

 

Major in Biological and Physical Sciences with Concentration in Geology (120 hours)

 

Lower-Level Science Requirements
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
MATH 1404
CS 1408 or 1410
All of the following lecture/laboratory courses:
BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108
GEOL 1405, 1406
PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108

 

Upper-Level Requirements
Forty-four hours are required.  Students must take GEOL 3410 (Mineralogy), GEOL 3490 (Petrology), GEOL 3411 (Paleontology), GEOL 3412 (Structural Geology), GEOL 3300 (Undergraduate Research), 4 hours of BIOL or MBIO upper-level, 4 hours CHEM or PHYS upper level and at least 17 additional upper-level GEOL courses. No more than 3 credit hours in upper-level sciences with a grade of D.  There are 6 additional hours of upper or lower level electives.

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Biology (120 hours)


Poonam Gulati, PhD, Coordinator
N819, 713-221-8066

 

The Bachelor of Science program provides both a broad-based curriculum in the Liberal Arts and in the Natural Sciences and a set of courses specifically in Biology. It is designed to meet the personal and career goals and interests of the student. The program allows the student a certain amount of flexibility in tai­loring a degree program to his/her unique needs, yet does so within the confines of a traditional major in biology. This degree is particularly appropriate for students interested in the follow­ing areas: dentistry, medicine and related fields that require post-graduate study, public health, graduate work in biological or biomedical sciences, and science education. The Natural Sciences Department also offers a B.S. in Biology with Concentration in Environmental Biosciences, Concentration in Microbiology, or Concentration in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences.

 

Course Requirements for the Biology Major
The approved degree plan for this program will be determined through consultation among the student, her/his advisor, and the chairperson of the department. A minimum of 120 hours of university-level work will be required. A maximum of 66 hours from junior or community colleges may be approved as credit toward this degree. All general requirements for graduation in the department and the university apply to this degree.

 

General Education Requirements
To fulfill the common core's speech requirement students can take communication courses listed in the university catalog under Core Curriculum options.  All common core requirements (math and science listed below) may be fulfilled by taking any of the courses listed as options.  The writing skills requirement is satisfied by ENG 3302, 3325, 3326, 3329, or 4306, and at least one designated W course in the natural sciences. The nonverbal analytical skills require­ment is satisfied by many of the required natural sciences courses. The general education program's emphases on ethical and moral issues and the world community are addressed by taking one course in each area. A list of approved courses for these two requirements is available from the Department of Natural Sciences website (Enhancement Courses link), program coordinator or the departmental office.

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
STAT 3311
MBIO 2305/2105
PHYS 1307/1107
PHYS 1308/1108

Biology Core Courses

BIOL 3303/3103
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 4340/4140
BIOL 3306 or BIOL/GEOL 4301
BIOL 4210 or MBIO 4210One of the following:
BIOL 3300, 4230, 4232, 4260, 4399*
(* enrollment in Honors Program required)

 

Biology Upper Level Options (20 hours and at least one in each area)
Cell/Molecular Area – BIOL 4320, 4330, 4230 or 4232 (if not used above), 3390/4390 (if approved), MBIO 4320/4120
Plant/Fungal Area – BIOL 3330/3130, 3310/3110, 3340/3140, 3390/4390 (if approved)
Environmental Area – BIOL 3302/3102, 4260 (if not used above), 4360, 4340, 4350, 3390/4390 (if approved)
Organismal Area – BIOL 3304/3104, 3305/3105, 3320/3120, 4303, 4313/4113, 4344, 4305, 3390/4390 (if approved), MBIO 3320 or
     4340/4140

 

Approved Upper Level Electives
  Three to 4 hours of electives must be approved by your faculty advisor and/or program coordinator. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate research experience to satisfy this requirement. Up to 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree as a student may have taken research as part of the Biology Core Courses.

 

Major in Biology with Concentration in Environmental Biosciences (120 hours)

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
STAT 3311
MBIO 2305/2105
PHYS 1307/1107
PHYS 1308/1108

 

Biology Core Courses
BIOL 3303/3103
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 4340/4140
BIOL 3306 or BIOL/GEOL 4301
BIOL 4210 or MBIO 4210
One of the following:
BIOL 3300, 4260, 4399*
(* enrollment in Honors Program required)

Courses for the Concentration (20 hours, *designated courses are required)
*BIOL 3302/3102
*BIOL 4360
*BIOL 3330/3130 or 3310/3110 (one of these)
MBIO 3340
CHEM 3320
GEOL 3303
BIOL 3340/3140
BIOL 3304/3104
BIOL 2390-4390 (if approved)

 

Approved Upper Level Electives
Three to 4 hours of electives must be approved by your faculty advisor and/or program coordinator. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate research experience to satisfy this requirement. Up to 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree as a student may have taken research as part of the Biology Core Courses.

 

Major in Biology with Concentration in Microbiology (120 hours)

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
STAT 3311
MBIO 2305/2105
PHYS 1307/1107
PHYS 1308/1108

 

Biology Core Courses
BIOL 3303/3103
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 4340/4140
BIOL 3306 or BIOL/GEOL 4301
BIOL 4210 or MBIO 4210
One of the following:
BIOL 3300, 4230, 4232, 4260, or 4399*
(* enrollment in Honors Program required)

Courses for the Concentration (20 hours, *designated courses are required)
*MBIO 3320
*MBIO 4320/4120
*MBIO 4340/4140
BIOL 4220
MBIO 3340
CHEM 4342
BIOL 4310/4110
MBIO 4310
MBIO 3350/3150
BIOL 2390-4390 (if approved)

 

Approved Upper Level Electives
Three to 4 hours of electives must be approved by your faculty advisor and/or program coordinator. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate research experience to satisfy this requirement. Up to 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree as a student may have taken research as part of the Biology Core Courses.

 

Major in Biology with Concentration in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (120 hours)

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
STAT 3311
MBIO 2305/2105
PHYS 1307/1107
PHYS 1308/1108

 

Biology Core Courses
BIOL 3303/3103
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 4340/4140
BIOL 3306 or BIOL/GEOL 4301
BIOL 4210 or MBIO 4210
One of the following:
BIOL 3300, 4230, 4232, or 4399*
(* enrollment in Honors Program required)

Courses for the Concentration (20 hours, *designated courses are required)
*BIOL 4330
*BIOL 4320
BIOL 4303
BIOL 4220
BIOL/CHEM 4344
MBIO 4320/4120
BIOL 4230 or 4232 (if not used above)
MBIO 3320
BIOL 3330/3130
MBIO 4310
CHEM 4342
BIOL 4310/4110
BIOL 2390-4390 (as approved)

 

Approved Upper Level Electives
Three to 4 hours of electives must be approved by your faculty advisor and/or program coordinator. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate research experience to satisfy this requirement. Up to 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree as a student may have taken research as part of the Biology Core Courses.

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Biotechnology (120 hours)

 

Phil Lyons, PhD, Coordinator
N608, 713- 221-8489

This Bachelor of Science program provides a rigorous, broad-based curriculum in the Liberal Arts and in the Natural Sciences, and a set of courses specifically directed toward the field of Biotechnology. This interdisciplinary program provides both entry-level job skills in biotechnology and a strong aca­demic background needed to pursue a master’s or doctorate degree in Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Microbiology or Molecular Biology. This program will also satisfy course require­ments for all major pre-professional degree programs in medi­cine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, and veterinary medicine.

General Education Requirements

To fulfill the common core’s speech requirement, COMM 1304, 3304 or 3306 are recommended. To fulfill the writing skills requirement, ENG 3302, 3325, 3326, 3329, or 4306, and at least one designated W course in the natural sciences. The nonverbal analytical skills require­ment is satisfied by many of the required math and natural sci­ences courses. The general education program's emphases on ethical and moral issues and the world community are addressed by taking one course in each area. A list of approved courses for these two requirements is available from the Department of Natural Sciences website (Enhancement Courses link), program coordinator or the departmental office.

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
(Some of the following courses may be taken to fulfill common core requirements)
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
STAT 3311
MBIO 2305/2105
Eight additional hours of lower-level biology or applied physics

 

Upper-Level Science
BIOL 3303/3103
BIOL 3330/3130 or 3340/3140
BIOL/MBIO 4210
BIOL 4230 or BIOL 4232
BIOL 4220 or 4330
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 4340/4140
MBIO 4310
MBIO 4320/4120
One of the following: CHEM 3302/3202, CHEM 3310/3110
One of the following: BIOL 4313/4113, BIOL 4325, BIOL/CHEM/MBIO 4390 (as approved by advisor), CHEM 4360, MBIO 3320, MBIO 3340, CS 3308, CS 3330, CS 4307, CS 4328, CS 4333, CS 4399
One of the following: BIOL 4320, CHEM 4342, CHEM 4364, MATH 3301, MATH 4304, MATH 4315, MATH 4399, STAT 4307

Research or internship in Biotechnology (3 hours)

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Chemistry (122 hours)

 

Byron Christmas, PhD, Coordinator
N809, 713-221-8169

 

Course Requirements for the Chemistry Major
The courses specified for this degree are approved by the American Chemical Society for a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. This degree will provide students with the knowledge needed to pursue graduate studies in chemistry or related fields.

 

The program is divided into three principal areas. The first area contains a group of courses in the liberal arts that provide the student with a broad-based general education. The second area contains courses that provide a strong foundation in basic sci­ence, including courses in biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics. The third area emphasizes the advanced methods, theories, and applications that are impor­tant to the world of chemistry. Some of the courses included in this area are organic chemistry, physical chemistry, quantitative analysis, and biochemistry. Students are required to participate in research during the jun­ior or senior year. All general requirements for graduation in the Department of Natural Sciences apply to this
degree.

 

General Education Requirements
To fulfill the common core’s speech requirement, COMM 1304 or 3306 is recommended. All common core requirements (math and science listed below) may be fulfilled by taking any of the courses listed as options  in the catalog. The writing skills requirement is satisfied by ENG 3302, 3325, 3326, 3329, or 4306 and CHEM 3320. The nonverbal analytical skills requirement is satisfied by many of the required math and natural sciences courses. The general education program's emphases on ethical and moral issues and the world community are addressed by taking one course in each area. A list of approved courses for these two requirements is available from the Department of Natural Sciences website (Enhancement Courses link), program coordinator or the departmental office.

 

Chemistry Major – Areas of Emphasis
Students majoring in Chemistry may choose to emphasize their curriculum in four specific areas: biochemistry, environmental chemistry, industrial chemistry and forensic science.  Students interested in these areas will be assigned an advisor specific to that area by the Chemistry degree coordinator.

 

Basic Science and Mathematics
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2401
MATH 2402
MATH 2403
PHYS 1307/1107 and 1308/1108 or 2401/2101 and 2402/2102
STAT 3311

 

Major Area of Emphasis
CHEM 3300
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3302/3202
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 3320
CHEM 3330/3130
CHEM 3332/3132
CHEM 4410
CHEM 4340/4140
CHEM 4362/4162
CHEM 4364.

 

Electives
Three hours, which the degree coordinator must approve. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate field experience or undergraduate research course to satisfy part of this requirement.

 

Major in Chemistry with Concentration in Biochemistry (120 hours)

 

Basic Science and Mathematics
BIOL 1301/1101, BIOL 1302/1102 CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108 CS 1408 or CS 1410, MATH 2411, MATH 2412, PHYS 1307/1107 and PHYS 1308/1108 or PHYS 2401/2101 and PHYS 2402/2102, STAT 3311

 

Major Area of Emphasis
BIOL 3303/3103
BIOL 3320/3120
BIOL 4320 or BIOL 4330
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3302/3202
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 3300
CHEM 3330/3130
CHEM 4340/4140
CHEM 4342 or CHEM 4344
CHEM 4362/4162

Electives

Five hours, which the degree coordinator must approve. Students are encouraged to use an appropriate field experience or undergraduate research course to satisfy part of this requirement.

 

Major in Chemistry with Concentration in Environmental Chemistry (122 hours)

 

Basic Science and Mathematics
BIOL 1301/1101, BIOL 1302/1102 CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108 CS 1408 or CS 1410, GEOL 1405, MBIO 2305/2105, MATH 2411, MATH 2412, PHYS 1307/1107 and PHYS 1308/1108 or PHYS 2401/2101 and PHYS 2402/2102, STAT 3311

 

Major Area of Emphasis
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3302/3202
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 3300
CHEM 3320
CHEM 3330/3130
CHEM 4340/4140
CHEM 4410
CHEM 4362/4161
CHEM 4364 or CHEM 4344 or CHEM 4360
BIOL 4360 or GEOL 3303 or MBIO 3340

 

Major in Chemistry with Concentration in Forensic Science (121 hours)

Basic Science and Mathematics
BIOL 1301/1101, BIOL 1302/1102 CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108 CS 1408 or CS 1410, MATH 2411, MATH 2412, PHYS 1307/1107 and PHYS 1308/1108 or PHYS 2401/2101 and PHYS 2402/2102, STAT 3311

 

Major Area of Emphasis
BIOL 3303/3103 or BIOL 3320/3120
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3302/3202
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 4380
CHEM 3330/3130
CHEM 4340/4140
CHEM 4342 or CHEM 4344
CHEM 4362/4162
CHEM 4410
CJ 3302
CJ 3305
CJ 3311

 

Major in Chemistry with Concentration in Industrial Chemistry (120 hours)

 

Basic Mathematics and Science
BIOL 1301/1101
BIOL 1302/1102
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 2411
MATH 2412
PHYS 1307/1107 & 1308/1108, or 2401/2101 & 2402/2102
STAT 3311

 

Major Area of Emphasis
CHEM 3300 or CHEM 4380
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3302/3202
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 3330/3130
CHEM 4410
CHEM 4360
CHEM 4340/4140
CHEM 4362/4162
CHEM 4364

Electives
At least 9 hours, which the degree coordinator must approve. No more than seven hours of lower-level courses may be used unless they are part of a minor approved by the degree coordi­nator. No more than six hours may be undergraduate research and/or appropriate field experience.

Bachelor of Science
Major in Geosciences (120 hours)

Ken Johnson, PhD, Coordinator
N822, 713-221-5375

 

The Bachelor of Science in Geosciences degree offers students a strong educational foundation in geology, while also providing them with the technical skills necessary for a challenging career in any one of the geology or geoscience-related industries or for the pursuit of a graduate degree.  Students majoring in geology may choose to tailor their curriculum in three specific areas:  geochemistry, petroleum geotechnology, and environmental geology.

Course Requirements for the Geosciences Major
The program is divided into three principal areas.  The first area contains a group of courses in the liberal arts that provide the student with a broad-based general education. The second area contains courses that provide a strong foundation in basic science including courses in geology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and computer science. The third area involves in-depth study in areas related to geology, including courses in mineralogy, petrology, structural geology, paleontology, and stratigraphy.  Students are required to participate in undergraduate research in some area of geology or earth science.  All general requirements for graduation in the Department of Natural Sciences apply to this degree.

General Education  Requirements (30 hours)
To fulfill the common core's speech requirement, COMM 1304 or 3306 is recommended. All common core requirements (math and science listed below) may be fulfilled by taking any of the courses listed as options under Common Core Requirements (at the front of this catalog).  The writing skills requirement is satisfied by ENG 3302, 3325, 3326, 3329, or 4306, and at least one W course in the natural sciences.  The non-verbal analytical skills requirement is satisfied by many of the required math and natural science courses.  The general education program's emphases on ethical and moral issues and the world community are addressed by taking one course in each area.  A list of approved courses for these two requirements is available from the Department of Natural Sciences website (Enhancement Courses link), the program coordinator, or the departmental office (N813).

Basic Mathematics and Science (40 hours)
GEOL 1405
GEOL 1406
CHEM 1307/1107
CHEM 1308/1108
PHYS 1307/1107 or 2401/2101
PHYS 1308/1108 or 2402/2102
CS 1408 or 1410
MATH 1404
MATH 2401 or 2411
MATH 2402 or 2412

Major Area of Emphasis (32 hours)
GEOL 3410
GEOL 3411
GEOL 3412
GEOL 3490 (Petrology)
GEOL 3490 (Stratigraphy)
GEOL 4390 (Geological Field Methods)
GEOL 4390 (Field Camp*)
GEOL 3300
STAT 3312
*to be coordinated with other universities

Areas of Concentration (15 hours)
Geochemistry
GEOL3340
GEOL 3490 (Atmospheres of Planets) and 8 hours from the following five options below:
GEOL3300
CHEM 3490 or PHYS 3490 (Thermal Properties of Materials)
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3310/3110
CHEM 3330/3130

Petroleum Geotechnology

CHEM 3490 or PHYS 3490 (Thermal Properties of Materials)
EM 3301
PLM3305
and 5 hours from the following:
GEOL 3300
GEOL3340
ENG 3302
Environmental Geology
GEOL 3303
GEOL 3340
PHIL 3320
ENG 3329
and 3 hours from the following:
GEOL 3300
GEOL 3390/3190 (Coastal Studies)
CHEM 3301/3201
CHEM 3320
GEOL 3490 (Atmospheres of Planets)

Electives (3 hours)
The degree coordinator must approve any electives.  Undergraduate Research (GEOL 3300/CHEM 3300/PHYS 3300) cannot be used to satisfy the elective requirement.

 

Pre-Professional Areas
The Department of Natural Sciences offers lower and upper-level courses in the academic and specialized areas described above. In addition, it provides courses that serve a number of pre-professional areas. Students in pre-dentistry, pre-medicine and pre-veterinary medicine who plan to earn a bachelor’s degree prior to entering the respective professional school may choose to fol­low one of the degree programs offered by the department. The pre-clinical course requirements for students interested in clinical laboratory science, dental hygiene, nursing, nutrition and dietet­ics, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician’s assistant and dentistry, medicine and veterinary medi­cine are described below. Since entrance requirements vary wide­ly and are subject to frequent changes, close consultation with an assigned advisor is recommended.

 

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology
Students who plan to become registered medical technologists must complete one year of clinical training during the fourth or fifth year of study. Prior to entering the clinical program they should complete the following courses: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, 3420; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201, 3310/3110, and 4340/4140; ENG 1301, 1302, and six hours of sophomore English; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; six hours of mathematics; MBIO 2305/2105, 4320/4120; PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108; suggested electives include BIOL 3303/3103, 3305/3105. The BS program in Biological and Physical Sciences is recommended for students interested in Medical Technology or Clinical Laboratory Science. UHD is affiliated with the School Clinical Laboratory Science Program at the Methodist Hospital of Houston.

 

Dental Hygiene
Students applying to schools of dental hygiene to pursue the Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene are required to complete at least 62 semester hours prior to their admission. Courses gen­erally required include: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102; CHEM 1305/1105; ENG 1301/1302, and 6 hours of sophomore English; POLS 2303, 2304; 3 hours of mathematics; HIST 1305, 1306; PSY 1303; SOC 1303; COMM 1304.

 

Medical Records Administration/Health Information Management Program
To qualify for the Medical Record Administration designation, a bachelor’s degree and completion of an accredited Medical Record Administration are required. There are two accredited HIM programs at the baccalaureate level in the State of Texas. The general requirements for the program in the State of Texas are: BIOL 1303/1103, 1304/1104; ENG 1301, 1302 and three hours of Sophomore English, POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1305; MBIO 1305/1105; three hours each of business, mathematics, computer science and speech; and up to 21 hours, which must include biology and other courses depending on the institution. Check with your advisor for the specific requirements for a given institution.

 

Nursing
Students who intend to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing are required to complete at least 60 semester hours prior to entering a school of nursing. Courses generally required include: ANTH 2302; BIOL 1303/1103, 1304/1104; CHEM 1305/1105, ENG 1301, 1302; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; STAT 2300 or SOS 3312; MBIO 1305/1105; PHIL 1301; PSY 1303, 3307; SOC 1303.

 

Nutrition and Dietetics
Students applying to schools of nutrition and dietetics to pursue the bachelor of science degree during their junior and senior year are required to complete at least 60 semester hours prior to their admission. UH-Downtown and the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences have a cooperative program for a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics. Lower-level courses required include: BIOL 1303/1103, 1304/1104; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201; ECO 2301 or 2302; ENG 1301, 1302 and 3 hours of sophomore English; POLS 2303, 2304; PSY 1303; SOC 1303. Recommended elec­tives include courses in physics, statistics, speech and additional courses in social sciences, biology and mathematics.

 

Occupational Therapy
Prior to admission to a clinical program in occupational therapy, students are required to complete a minimum of 60 semester hours. Courses generally required include: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, 1303/1103, or 3304/3104, 1304/1104 or 3305/3105; CHEM 1307/1107, ENG 1301, 1302, plus zero-six hours of literature; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; zero-six hours of mathematics; PHYS 1307/1107; six hours of psychology, three-six hours of sociology and zero-three hours of speech. TWU requires a baccalaureate degree for transfer students.


Optometry
Students applying to the UH College of Optometry to pursue the bachelor of science and doctor of optometry degrees are required to complete a baccalaureate degree prior to their admission. Students may apply for admission while completing their pre-optometry course work. Courses required to enter the University of Houston College of Optometry include: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, 3305/3105, 3320/3120; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201 and 4340; ENG 1301, 1302, and 6 hours of sophomore English; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; MATH 1404, 2401; MBIO 2305/2105; PHYS 1303; PSY 1303; STAT 3311; electives: six hours from art, drama, history, literature, music and philosophy.

Pharmacy

The schools of Pharmacy in the State of Texas are now instituting the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) as the entry level degree for the field of pharmacy. For admission to the program at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy the courses listed below must be successfully completed or in progress. The courses listed also meet all but one or two of the minor requirements for admission to the colleges of pharmacy at the University of Texas at Austin, Texas Southern University, and Texas Tech University.

BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201, 3302/3202; ENG 1301, 1302 and three hours of sophomore English; POLS 2303, 2304, HIST 1305, 1306; MATH 1306; MBIO 2305/2105; PHYS 1307/1107, PSY 1303, PSY 2302 or SOC 1303, STAT 2300; Six hours of Cultural Heritage electives which meet the requirements of the UH core curriculum. Suggested electives are BIOL 3305/3105 and CHEM 4340/4140, COMM 1304, 3304 or 3306.

 

Physical Therapy
Most physical therapy programs require a Bachelor of Science degree prior to admission. Courses required include: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, 3305/3105, 3320/3120; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108; COMM 1304; ENG 1301, 1302; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; MATH 1301; PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108; PSY 1303, 2310; SOC 1303; STAT 2300. The BS program in Biological and Physical Sciences is recommended for students interested in Physical Therapy.

Physician’s Assistant

Prior to admission to a program leading to professional certifi­cation as a physician’s assistant, students must complete a mini­mum of 90 hours. Many students who enter these programs have a four-year degree. Some programs require a degree prior to admission. Students should consult with their advisor for the requirements of the program(s) they are interested in. Courses generally required are: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102 and 1303/1103, 1304/1104; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, ENG 1301, 1302, three hours of literature; three hours of speech; POLS 2303, 2304; HIST 1305, 1306; MATH 1301; MBIO 2305/2105, STAT 2300; nine hours of behavioral and social sciences; eight hours of electives in health-related areas; and a computer literacy course.

 

Dentistry and Medicine*
A baccalaureate degree is strongly recommended for all pre-dental and pre-medical students since dental and medical col­leges accept very few students without a degree. The courses required of most pre-dental and pre-medical students in Texas prior to admission include: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102 and eight hours of advanced biology with lab, CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201, 3302/3202, 4340; ENG 1301, 1302 and six hours of sophomore English (may include ENG 3302), MATH 2401 (except for dental students); PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108.

 

Veterinary Medicine*
A baccalaureate degree is recommended for all pre-veterinary medicine students. The following lists the minimum requirements for admission to the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine: BIOL 1301/1101, 1302/1102, 3303/3103; CHEM 1307/1107, 1308/1108, 3301/3201, 4340/4140; MATH 2401 or STAT 2300; MBIO 2305/2105; PHYS 1307/1107, 1308/1108; COMM 1304; ENG 1301, 1302, 3302, three hours of literature, three hours of technical writing, and a three hour course in animal nutrition.

 

*After completion of 30 semester hours of university-level work and passing all sections of the THEA exam, the pre-dental, pre-medical and pre-veterinary major must contact the Health Professions Advisory Committee in order to be assigned a permanent faculty advisor. The advisor and other committee members will be responsible for advising the student, providing information about application procedures and professional entrance exams, and providing letters of evaluation.

 

 

 

 


 




 

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