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UHD Undergraduate Academic Programs - College of Humanities & Social Sciences

DoVeanna S. Fulton, PhD, Dean
S1015, 713-221-8009

 

David B. Ryden, PhD, Associate Dean
S1015, 713-221-2767

 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS) offers degrees in traditional liberal arts disciplines and interdisciplinary studies and in select applied programs that serve important needs in our employment and educational market.  The college also supports and enriches the broader curriculum and enhances the life of the university community through co-curricular initiatives in the Departments of Arts and Humanities, English, and Social Sciences and in the work of the O' Kane Theatre, O' Kane Gallery, and Cultural Enrichment Center.

 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is committed to teaching, research/creative activities, and service. At the heart of CHSS is the value placed on the diversity of humanity and a belief in education as the foundation of an empowered, free, and engaged citizenry capable of individual creativity and social responsibility. Faculty members demonstrate and students develop this capacity through multiple disciplinary perspectives: historical and theoretical inquiry, quantitative and critical/qualitative analysis, and creative cultural production. CHSS students gain crucial communication skills (critical thinking, reading, writing, and speaking) and respect for the breadth of human experience essential for thriving in complex global communities.

 

Requirements for Majors

 

All undergraduate degree programs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences require a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in residence and a minimum of 18 upper-level semester credit hours earned at UHD. The College reserves the right to limit the number of directed study, internship, service learning, experience learning, and credit-by-examination credit hours that can be applied to degree requirements, especially major requirements. 

Students are responsible for being aware of all degree requirements and for complying with them without duplicating any courses.

 

Programs of Study

 

Degree Programs

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers the following degree programs:

 

Bachelor of Arts with majors in:
Communication Studies
English
Fine Arts
History
Humanities
Philosophy
Social Sciences
Spanish

 

Bachelor of Science with majors in:
Political Science
Professional Writing
Psychology
Social Sciences
Sociology   

 

General Education Requirements

All students seeking a bachelor’s degree at the University of Houston-Downtown must complete the general education requirements, including the common core cours­es, application courses, and enhancement courses.  See the General Education section of this catalog for more information about these requirements.

 

Being Accepted as a Declared Major

All undergraduate students at UHD are advised in University College until they are accepted into a degree program. Before applying for a degree major in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, a student must:
•   have fulfilled all Texas Success Initiative obligations;
•   have completed all required developmental courses;
•   have completed ENG 1302 and Math 1301/1310 or equivalent;
•   have completed a minimum of 30 hours, excluding developmental courses;
•   be in good academic standing with a UHD GPA of 2.0 or above or, for first-semester transfer students, a GPA of 2.0 or above at their last institution; and
•   submit all college transcripts and meet all other requirements necessary for release by University College.

 

Students apply for a major by completing the electronic application in MyUHD. Applicants should review carefully any requirements listed above that the electronic application designates as unfulfilled. If any English, math or other Texas general education core coursework is listed as unfulfilled, but applicants believe they have fulfilled it in transfer coursework, they should confirm with Admissions that the transcript has been received and that the evaluation / articulation of the transcript has been completed.  If the transcript has been received but not yet evaluated / articulated, students should submit an evaluation request at http://www.uhd.edu/admissions/evaluation.html.  Students whose evaluations have been completed and who still cannot declare their majors online should speak with a University College advisor in Room 370-South to request a “manual declaration.”

 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences Advising Center staff will inform students of their acceptance via UHD e-mail and prepare a degree plan.  This degree plan will be available in the CHSS Academic Advising Center in Room 1001-South and will track fulfillment of degree requirements by transfer and UHD coursework.

 

CHSS Academic Advising
S1001, 713-221-8460

 

The College provides faculty and professional advisors to:

  • advise majors on degree and graduation requirements as well as selection of courses
  • initiate the student’s application for graduation during course registration for the semester that degree requirements are to be completed
  • initiate waivers of degree requirements or requests to exceed the maximum semester course load

 

Students are responsible for being aware of all degree requirements and for complying with them without duplicating any courses.

Students should always include their full name and UHD ID number in all correspondence and voicemail messages.

 

Advising sessions can take place in one of three ways: 

  • by appointment.   Appointments can be set by phone (713-221-8460) or in person (1001 S).
  • by walk-in visit.    The online CHSS schedule lists walk-in days: 
  • by email visit.       CHSS_Advising@uhd.edu, through GatorMail.

 

The CHSS advising schedule at http://www.uhd.edu/academic/colleges/humanities/college/ad_schedule.html contains additional contact information. 

Before consulting with a college advisor to register for coursework, students should review the requirements for their academic degree described in this catalog, select potential courses to fulfill degree requirements, and prepare a tentative course schedule. Courses, course status (open or closed), and class times for each academic semester are available online in MyUHD.

 

Although majors in good academic standing are given access to priority registration and may self-advise and register online on MyUHD , students are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor before the semester begins. 

 

Majors on academ­ic probation who wish to register for next semester courses must meet with a college advisor and then see the Associate Dean or the Assistant Dean for course approval. Majors on academic suspension who have not attended UHD for the preceding long semester must apply for readmission  to the University and then must consult with the Assistant or Associate Dean at least one week prior to the first day of class.  With the Associate or Assistant Dean’s authorization, , the student will be placed on academic probation and permitted to take a limited number of approved classes. 

 

Applying for Graduation

 

Students planning to graduate from UHD with a major in an area in CHSS must file an application for graduation with a CHSS academic advisor in the term prior to their final semester.  Students should always include their full name and UHD ID number in all correspondence and voicemail messages.

 

Step 1:  Filing the application for graduation.

  • On-campus students can file in person with a CHSS advisor in 1001 South.
  • On-line students and UHD-NW students may file:
    • through GatorMail by contacting Ms. Ali Ferguson at fergusonal@uhd.edu to request that an application be filed on their behalf. 
    • by telephone by calling 713-221-8460 to schedule an advising and/or application filing appointment to be conducted by phone.

Step 2:  Completing the Diploma Order Form.  The form must be filed electronically from http://www.uhd.edu/registrar/documents/diploma_order_form.pdf .

Step 3:  Paying the mandatory $50 graduation/diploma fee to the UHD Cashier’s Office.

 

A CHSS video with additional information about graduation is available online:  http://www.uhd.edu/academic/colleges/humanities/college/vid.html.

 

Deadlines for applications for graduation can be found on the academic calendar for the given term.  The deadlines for students planning to graduate in a Winter or May term are the same as for a student planning to complete in a Fall or Spring term respectively.  Students who do not complete the requirements in the anticipated term of graduation must reapply for graduation, following Steps 1 & 2 above.  Repayment of the fee is not required.

 

The CHSS Advising Center and Dean’s Office will communicate any information about students’ applications for graduation through GatorMail, so students who have submitted an application for graduation should begin checking their GatorMail  a week after the posted deadline.

 

Requirements for Minors

 

Students seeking minors in CHSS must maintain a grade point average for all courses taken at UH-Downtown of at least 2.0, receive a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward the minor, and must meet all requirements of the chosen minor, including prerequisites for courses taken toward the minor.  Students must complete all requirements for minors in addition to all course work required for the degree before graduation.  All minor programs in CHSS, with the exception of a minor in art, require at least 9 hours upper-level course work in residence at UHD.  The Art minor requires only 6 hours of upper-level coursework (see full description under the  Arts and Humanities section).

 

To declare a minor, students with majors in CHSS file the Minor Declaration Form with a CHSS advisor.  Students with majors in other colleges who select a minor in CHSS should file the Minor Declaration Form with an advisor in their home college.  In both cases, CHSS advisors fill out a form which lists the requirements for the minor, indicating which courses already taken apply toward the minor.  This record is thereafter maintained by the home college advisors and the minor is certified by the Associate or Assistant Dean of the home college.

 

Minor Programs

 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers under­graduate minors in a number of fields and subfields of the college’s disciplines.  Detailed requirements for each minor, including the total number of hours required and courses eligible for the minor, are listed under the Minor Programs in the catalog sections for the department offering the minor:  Prerequisites for courses to support a minor cannot be waived.

 

Department of Arts and Humanities

  • Art
  • Arts Administration
  • Communication Studies
  • Drama
  • Spanish-English Professional Translation                          


Department of English

  • Creative Writing

 

Digital Media

  • English
  • Professional Writing


Department of Social Sciences     

  • History
  • International Politics
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Policy and Administration
  • Quantitative Methods in Research Sociology

 

Interdisciplinary Minors

 

Interdisciplinary Minors offer students the opportunity to explore a subject from multiple perspectives.  Courses in these minors are principally taught by faculty from the Departments of Arts and Humanities, English, and Social Sciences, with select course offerings from faculty in other colleges.  Students must meet the academic Requirements for Minors described above.  Prerequisites for courses to support a minor cannot be waived, and internship/field experience courses cannot be applied to these minors.

 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers interdisci­plinary minors in

  • Ethnic Studies
  • Film Studies
  • Gender Studies
  • Religious Studies
  • Spanish-English Professional Translation

 

Ethnic Studies
Sharin Elkholy, PhD, Coordinator
N1061, 713-221-8693

 

18 approved hours required, with at least 9 upper-level hours taken at UHD. Prerequisites cannot be waived; see a college advisor for approval of upper-level business courses.  The following courses will apply to the minor without advisor approval:

 

ANTH 2302 Cultural Anthropology
ART 3311 / HUM 3311 Survey of Asian Art
COMM 2307 Intercultural Communications
COMM 3313 Race, Ethnicity, and Communication
CJ 3317 Race and Crime
DRA 3309 / HUM 3319 African American Theater: History and Perspective
ENG 3321 African-American Literature
ENG 3322 Mexican-American Literature
ENG 3341 Postcolonial Studies
ENG 4324 Seminar in Ethnic Studies
HIST 2309 Ethnic Minorities in American History
HIST 3308 History of Mexico
HIST 3318 Latin American History
HIST 3322 African-American History
HIST 3322 Mexican-American History
HIST 3333 Antislavery Movements
HIST 4320 Slavery in the Americas
HUM 3304 American Ethnic Heritage
HUM 3311 / ART 3311 Survey of Asian Art
HUM 3319 / DRA 3309 African American Theater: History and Perspective
HUM 3320 Foreign Language Literature in Translation
HUM 3321 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
HUM 3317 / MUS 3303 Jazz Styles I
HUM 3318 / MUS 3304 Jazz Styles II
MGT 3307  Equal Opportunity in Management
MUS 3302 Introduction to African-American Music
MUS 3303 / HUM 3317 Jazz Styles I
MUS 3304 / HUM 3318 Jazz Styles II
MUS 3305 World Musics
PED 3314 Children’s Literature in Spanish (Requires admission to Teacher Education program; taught in Spanish)
PHIL 3317 Philosophy of Race
PHIL 3322 World Religions
POLS 3303 Urban Politics
POLS 3306 Civil Liberties in the United States
POLS 3312 Hispanic Politics
POLS 4304 American Political Thought
PSY 4303 African-American Issues in Psychology
PSY 4304 Multicultural Psychology
PSY 4313 Psychology of Prejudice
SOC 3304 Minorities in America
SOC 3306 Social Inequality
SOC 4305 Urban Sociology
SOSE 3306 Culture of the Urban School
SPAN 3324 Neighbors and Trading Partners: People, Culture and Trade in Spanish America (taught in Spanish)
All SPAN literature and film courses (taught in Spanish)
Students may petition to apply toward the minor other courses taught with a significant ethnic studies focus. Petitions should be initiated with a college advisor.

 

Film Studies
Charles Jackson, PhD, Coordinator
S1069, 713-221-8615

18 approved hours required, with at least 9 hours taken at UHD.  Prerequisites cannot be waived.  The following courses will apply to the minor without advisor approval.

 

Required coursework: 3 hours

    ENG 3354 Introduction to Film Studies (formerly Film as Narrative)

 

Elective coursework: 15 hours, selected from the following:

    COMM 2305 / ART 2305  Film Appreciation
    COMM 3317 / ART 3315 Film Analysis
    ENG 3356 Early Cinema
    ENG 3357 Film Theory
    ENG 4327 Advanced Film Studies
    HUM 3327 Myth and Film
        PHIL 3355 Philosophy and Film
    SOC 4302 Sociocultural Analysis of Film
    SPAN 3385 Introduction to Hispanic Film
    XXX 4390:  Any CHSS Special Topics course that focuses on film

 

Students may petition to apply toward the minor other courses taught with a significant film studies focus. Petitions should be initiated with a college advisor.

 

Gender Studies

Cara Murray, PhD, Coordinator
S1022, 713-223-7923

 

18 approved hours required. 12 hours at the upper-level, with at least 9 hours taken at UHD. Prerequisites cannot be waived; see a college advisor for approval of upper-level business courses. The following courses will apply to the minor without advisor approval:

 

BIOL 4350 Social Biology
COMM 3308 Family Communication
COMM 3310 Women, Men, and Communication
COMM 3316 Sex, Love, and Romance in the Mass Media
CJ 3318 Sex Crimes
CJ 4314 Women and the Criminal Justice System
ENG 3350 Gender Studies in Literature
ENG 4350 Advanced Gender Studies
HIST 4303 US Women’s History
HIST 4321 The Rise of Modern Women
MGT 3307 Diversity Management
PHIL 3319 Philosophy of Gender
POLS 4306 Women and Politics
PSY 3310 Psychology of Women
PSY 4313 Psychology of Prejudice
SOC 2303 Family in a Changing Society
SOC 3306 Social Inequality
SOC 3315 Sex and Gender
SOS 2308 Human Sexuality

 

Students may petition to apply toward the minor other courses taught with a significant gender studies focus. Petitions should be initiated with a college advisor.

 

Religious Studies

Edmund Cueva, PhD, Interim Coordinator
S1009-E, 713-226-5543

 

18 approved hours required. 12 hours at the upper-level, with at least 9 hours taken at UHD. Prerequisites cannot be waived.. The following courses will apply to the minor without advisor approval:

 

Required coursework: 3 hours chosen from the following
     ENG 3352 Studies in World Mythology and Folklore
     HUM 4317 World Mythology
     PHIL 3322 World Religions

 

Required coursework: 3 hours chosen from the following
    ENG 3385 Studies in Religious Texts
    HUM 4314 The Old Testament
    HUM 4315 The New Testament
    HUM 4316 The Early Christian Church

 

12 hours chosen from the following
    ART 3306 Art and Religion – Origins
    ART 3307 Art and Religion – Development
    COMM 4335  Communication and Religion
    ENG 3352 Studies in World Mythology and Folklore
    ENG 3385 Studies in Religious Texts
    HIST 3340 History of Religion in the United States
    HUM 4314 The Old Testament
    HUM 4315 The New Testament
    HUM 4316 The Early Christian Church
    HUM 4317 World Mythology
    MUS 3301 / HUM 3331 Music in American Christianity
    PHIL 3322 World Religions
    PHIL 3323 Philosophy of Religion
    SOC 4317 Religion in a Changing Society
    SOS 3304 Death and Dying

 

Students may petition to apply toward the minor other courses taught with a significant religious studies focus. Petitions should be initiated with a college advisor.

 

Spanish-English Professional Translation

 

Rey Romero, PhD.  Coordinator
N 1055 , 713-226-5549

 

Required coursework:  9 hours
SPAN 3301 Spanish Grammar and Composition
SPAN 3322  Introduction to Slpanish Translation
SPAN 4380  Field Experience.  With permission of the minor internship coordinator, it may be substituted by COMM 4380, ENG 4380, or CJ 4380, if the field experience includes translation, interpretation, or a bilinguial environment in which both English and Spanish must be used.

 

Medical Track:  9 hours
This track focuses on the content, linguistic knowledge, and translation skills necessary for translating documents from the healthcare professions.  It is recommended for Spanish, Communication Studies, and Professional Writing majors.
ENG 3325  Medical Writing
SPAN 4320  Medical Spanish
One of the following:
COMM 2301  Introducation to Health Communication
COMM 3321 Patient-Provider Communication

 

Legal Track:  9 hours
This track focuses on the content, linguistic knowledge, and translation skills necessary for translating documents from the legal professions, especially criminal law.  It is recommended for Spanish, Criminal Justice, or Professional Writing majors. 
ENG 3308  Legal Writing
SPAN 4321  Legal Spanish Translation
One of the following:
CJ 1301  Crime, Law and Society
CJ 3304 Criminal Law

 

General Track:  9 hours
This track incorporates several of the translation courses and other courses that help analyze the English language.  This is recommended for students who wish to broaden their knowledge base in professional translation and who are Professional Writing or Spanish majors.
ENG 3346  Literary Translation
One of the following:
SPAN 4320 Medical Spanish
SPAN 4321 Legal Spanish Translation
One of the following:
ENG 3318  Studies in English Grammar
ENG 3319  Introduction to the Study of Language

 

Department of Arts and Humanities

Edmund P. Cueva, PhD, Chair
S1009, 713-221-8104

 

Faculty

Professors:

Cueva, Fulton, Hagen, Kendall, Lyttle, Newsum, Roubicek, Wanguri

Associate Professors:

Baker, Cervenka, Chiquillo, DeWitt, Lawrence, , Nowak, Padilla, Rejaie, Shelley

Assistant Professors:

Bowen,  Hernandez, Mandell, Murray, Romero, Siriko-Hoang, Vela

Lecturers:

Dickson, L. Jackson, Mitha, Mueller, B. Pogue, K. Pogue, Schlag, R. Wilson

Academic Areas:

Arabic, Art, Chinese, Communication Studies, Drama, French, Humanities, Music, Religious Studies, Spanish

 

Programs of Study

Bachelor of Arts with major in Communication Studies
Bachelor of Arts with major in Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts with major in Humanities
Bachelor of Arts with major in Spanish 

Mission and Objectives

The multiple disciplines that comprise the University of Houston-Downtown Department of Arts and Humanities and the stimulating ethnic and cultural diversity of our faculty and students both create and reflect our commitment to the truest sense of the liberal arts. Through the excellence of our faculty in the areas of teaching, scholarship, creativity and service, our mission is to educate students to think critically so that they will then be able to use appropriate communication skills to express effectively their ideas in a variety of media. The critical, historical, and global perspective we offer in the study oflanguages, rhetoric, and the visual and performing arts is enhanced by courses that offer hands-on applications, including those that incorporate new technologies. Such inclusion further broadens the scope of the liberal arts tradition by taking advantage of contemporary advances to build on past wisdom while anticipating future innovations. Students who wish to pursue a general liberal course of studies may enroll in the program leading to either the Bachelor of Science with a major in Interdisciplinary Studies (see information in the University College section of this catalog) or the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Humanities. Students seeking to work in the communications profession pursue the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Communication Studies. A Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts degree prepares students for careers in the visual and performing arts industry. The department also offers a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish designed to prepare students for bilingual professions.

 

Honor Societies
Lamba Pi Eta, Communication Honor Society
Sigma Delta Pi, Spanish Honor Society

 

Bachelor of Arts

Major in Communication Studies

 

Deborah Shelley, PhD, Schedule Coordinator
S1009, 713-221-8082
Toni Siriko-Hoang, PhD, Degree Coordinator
S1083, 713-222-5373

 

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies gain a thorough grounding in the theories, skills, and aesthetics of communication. Students learn how to be effective communicators in a variety of contexts and are equipped to become inquisitive, probing and reflective professionals and cit­izens. The degree offers students a broad foundation in theory and practice, with technological application in support of its courses. Besides the core curriculum and the major require­ments, the degree includes course work in adjacent academic disciplines, such as writing and the social sciences.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Communications Studies will:

  • identify the common denominators that connect each communication context: interpersonal, organizational, and public.
    • evaluate effective messages 
    • prepare and deliver effective oral presentations using appropriate media and technology 
    • develop effective written messages.
  • use principles, theories, and concepts to analyze communication interactions.
    • find, interpret, and evaluate communication research 
    • design and conduct experimental communication research.
  • participate in high-impact initiatives that apply communication skills outside the classroom.

 

Degree Requirements
The Communication Studies major requires a minimum of 120 hours with a concentration in Corporate Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Health Communication, or Rhetorical/Public Communication. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours toward the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level hour requirements.  Students must complete COMM 4098 Senior Portfolio in their final term in order to graduate.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.   The 3-hr. COMM requirement must be filled by COMM 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 2307, or 2309.

 

Preparatory Requirements 21-hours)

COMM 1304 Introduction to Speech Communication (or a lower-level COMM elective if 1304 is taken in core)
COMM 1306 Beginning Public Speaking (or a lower-level COMM elective if 1306 is taken in core)
Foundational course in concentration
            COMM 2301 Introduction to Health Communication for Health Concentration
            COMM 2307 Intercultural Communication for Corporate Concentration
            COMM 2309 Interpersonal Communcication for Interpersonal Concentration
A lower-level COMM elective for Rhetorical/Public Communication Concentration, as COMM 1306 serves as its foundational course
Fine Arts (3 hours) (ART, DRA, MUS or their cross-listed equivalents like  COMM 2305/ART 2305 Film Appreciation or COMM 3317/ART 3315 Film Analysis) Social Sciences (3 hours)  (SOC 2303 Family in a Changing Society or SOS 2308 Human Sexuality recommended for Interpersonal Concentration)
Foreign language in one language (6-8 hours)*
*Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits. 
Hours in excess of 3 hours for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper-Level Requirements for all concentrations  (9 hours).  With the exception of COMM 4098, these courses should be taken before other upper-level requirements.  
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing
COMM 3314 Research in Communication Studies
COMM 3320 Communication Theory
COMM 4098 Portfolio taken in final term

 

Upper-Level Requirements for Rhetorical/Public Communication Concentration (30 hours)
15 hours selected from among the following:  COMM 3303, 3304, 3305, 3307, 3311, 3312, 3317*, 3318, 3319, 3325, 4301, 4302*, 4315, 4324, 4325, 4335, 4380 (may be taken 2 times for 6 hours of credit)

15 hours of additional coursework, including any courses from the previous list plus
            At least 6 hours from among the following: COMM 3306, 3308, 3310, 3313, 3315, 3316, 3321, 3323, 3328, 3330, 3340, 3399 (no more than 3 hours), 4310, 4330, 4390* and
            No more than 9 hours from among the following:  ENG 3316, ENG 3317, ENG 3340/HUM 3310, ENG 3354, ENG 3356, ENG 3357, PHIL 3355, PHI 3360, POLS 3300, POLS 3301, POLS 3302, POLS 3307, POLS 3311, POLS 4311, SOC 4301, SOC 4302, SOC 4310, SOC 4331, SPAN 3320 (taught in Spanish), SPAN 3385 (taught in Spanish)

 

Upper-Level Requirements for Interpersonal Communication Concentration (30 hours)
    15 hours selected from among the following:  COMM 3308, 3309, 3310, 3316, 3319, 3328, 3330, 4301

    15 hours of additional coursework, including any courses from the previous list plus
At least 6 hours from among the following: COMM 3313, 3315, 3317, 3321, 3399 (no more than 3 hours), 4380 (may be taken 2 times for 6 hours of credit), 4390* and
No more than 9 hours from among the following: ENG 3350, PHIL 3317, PHIL 3319, PSY 3310, PSY 4315, PSY 4316, SOC 3304, SOC 3315, SOCW 3361, SOCW 3362, SOS 3304

 

Upper-Level Requirements for Corporate Communication Concentration (30 hours)
    15 hours:  COMM 3306, 3309, 3340, 4310, 4330

    15 hours of additional coursework:
At least 6 hours from among the following:  COMM 3301, 3303, 3304, 3305, 3311, 3312, 3315, 3318, 3319, 3399 (no more than 3 hours), 4301, 4302*, 4380 (may be taken 2 times for 6 hours of credit), 4390* and
No more than 9 hours from among the following:  DRA 3325, ENG 3330, ENG 3335, ENG 3336, PSY 3301, SOC 4308

 

Upper-Level Requirements for Health Communication Concentration (30 hours)
    21-30 hours selected from among the following:  COMM 3308, 3310, 3313, 3315, 3318, 3321, 3323, 3328, 3330, 3340, 3399 (no more than 3 hours), 4301, 4302*, 4310, 4325, 4330, 4380 (may be taken 2 times for 6 hours of credit), 4390*

    No more than 9 hours from among the following:  ANTH 3313, HUM 3310/ENG 3340, ENG 3323, PHIL 3301, PSY 3310, PSY 3312, PSY 3319, PSY 4310, PSY 4316, SOC 3309, SOS 3313, SOS 3304, SOC 4318, SOCW 3361, SOCW 3362

*COMM 3317, 4302 and 4390 may be repeated once for credit if course titles and descriptions are different and are relevant to the concentration.

 

Free Electives (18 hours)
   3 hours ethics (unless fulfilled elsewhere; COMM 4325 is recommended)
15 hours from any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300, and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Bachelor of Arts

Major in Fine Arts

Azar Rejaie, PhD,  Coordinator
S1081, 713-222-5300

 

The courses that form the core of the Fine Arts degree develop students’ skills and cultural knowledge in ways appropriate to success in any number of fine arts institutions, including fine arts non-profit organizations; fine arts administration positions; gallery, museum or fine arts foundation work; fine arts journals or publications; fine arts consulting;; or graduate school in art history, music history, drama history or liberal studies. Students with the degree in Fine Arts will complement  their fine arts study by fulfilling a concentration in one of the fields of the fine arts - art, music, or drama - that suits their professional goals. They will also complete a field experience in that concentration area to provide practical experience and to encourage networking  that can lead to employment after graduation. Students will exit the program with a portfolio of their work that may be used when seeking employment.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Fine Arts will be able to:

  • Describe the historical and stylistic development of each of the fine arts;
  • Effectively write about the significance of humanities and fine arts products and performances;
  • Express ideas through one or more non-written media or performance.
  • Use basic design and graphic software suitable for producing brochures, ads and postcards.

 

Degree requirements
The Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts requires a minimum of 120 hours. Two courses must be in studio (other than graphic design). For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours applied to the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the 39 upper-level hours in the major. In addition to the requirements listed below, every student’s program must include a nonverbal analytical reasoning course (an “S” course), either as an elective or in fulfillment of a requirement

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Preparatory Requirements (30 hours)
ART 1307  Computer Graphic Design
ACC 1301 Accounting for Non-Business Majors (fulfills S course; prerequisite is any college-level MATH )
Philosophy (ethics)
3 hours ART
3 hours DRA
3 hours MUS
3 hours Fine Arts elective (ART, DRA, or MUS)
Foreign language:* At least 6 hours of a single foreign language through Elementary II plus 3 hours of the same language (Intermediate I) ora course focusing on a specific culture, such as:
HIST 2309 Ethnic Minorities in American History
COMM 2307 Intercultural Communication
ENG 3322 Mexican-American Literature
HUM 3304 American Ethnic Heritage
HUM 3320 Foreign Literature in Translation
HUM 3321 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
*Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits.  Hours in      excess of 3 for any FL course may be applied toward a free electives.

 

Upper-Level Requirements (39 hours)
MGT 3301 Management of Organizations*
MKT 3301 Principles of Marketing*
ART 3305 Advanced Computer Graphics
3 hours written communication
(ENG 3302, 3326, 3333, 3334, 3336, 3342, 3371; COMM 3311,  3312)
HUM 3310 Cultural Criticism
HUM 3325 Arts Administration
12 hours in a single Fine Arts discipline:  ART, DRA, or MUS
6 hours upper-level fine arts electives (3 hours in each of the two areas outside the 12-hr. concentration area)
HUM 4380 Field Experience, related to the concentration area
HUM 4098 Portfolio
* Prerequisites for upper-level business courses may not be waived, and these courses list BA 3300 as a co-requisite or a pre-requisite.  HUM 3310 and CJ 3300 serve as pre-requisites. See a CHSS advisor to register in these business courses.
Two courses in preparatory or upper-level Fine Arts coursework must be performance or studio courses. Visual Art Studio courses include Design and Materials, Design Color and Structure, Drawing I, Drawing II, Figure Drawing, Painting I, Painting II, Watercolor Painting I, Watercolor Painting II, and certain Special Topics courses.  Drama Studio courses include Acting I, Acting II, Stage Design, Stagecraft, Advanced Stagecraft, Stage Directing, and certain Special Topics courses.  Music Studio courses include classes in Voice Performance, Piano, and Guitar.

 

Electives (9 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

Bachelor of Arts

Major in Humanities

 

Kirk Hagen, PhD, Coordinator
S1027, 713-221-8116

The study of the humanities is an investigation of human institu­tions and artistic achievement, the values embodied in those institutions and works, and the range of aesthetic and philo­sophic responses to the human condition. The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities program gives a student experience with litera­ture, philosophic writings, the history of human culture, and the performing and visual arts, as well as a framework for critical consideration of cultural values and their expression in institu­tions, literature and the fine arts.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Humanities will:

  • Identify and discuss major intellectual trends of Western and World Cultures from antiquity to the present in many domains, including arts, music, literature, science, philosophy, theology, and politics.
  • Identify and discuss the historical and cultural contexts in which the great artistic and literary works of Western and non-Western traditions appeared.
  • Identify and analyze important works of Western and World Cultures in a way that makes them relevant in the 21st century.
  •  Use correct English syntax and semantics, cogent reasoning and rebuttal skills, cohesiveness of expression, and effective argumentation.
  • Use standard computer office suites like MS Office or OpenOffice to produce professional appearing documents.
  • Write papers that comply with MLA, APA, or Chicago style guidelines.

 

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours applied to the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. Because this is an interdiscipli­nary degree, no more than 18 hours of upper-level work in a single discipline may be applied to the major, and no more than 27 total hours in a single discipline (excluding course work required to fulfill common core requirements) may be used to satisfy degree requirements. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the 33 upper-level hours in the major. In addition to the requirements listed below, every student’s program must include a nonverbal analytical reasoning course, either as an elective or in fulfillment of a requirement.  Graduating seniors must enroll in HUM 4098 and submit a portfolio of writing samples.  See the degree coordinator for more information shortly after you declare your major. 

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Preparatory Requirements (30hours)
Philosophy: 6 hours (at least 3 hours of ethics) 
Fine arts: 6 hours (at least 3 hours in history or appreciation)
Written communication: 3 hours beyond ENG 1302
Communication Studies: 3 hours
Language and culture: 12-hours
At least 6 hours of a single foreign language (through Elementary II), and 6 hours of course work focusing on other cultures or languages, such as:
ART 3311 / HUM 3311 Survey of Asian Art
DRA 3309 / HUM 3319 African American Theater
HIST 2309 Ethnic Minorities in American History
COMM 2307 Intercultural Communication
ENG 3321 African-American Literature
ENG 3322 Mexican-American Literature
ENG 3387 Studies in World Literature and Culture
HIST 3308 History of Mexico
HIST 3310 20th Century Russia
HIST 3317 Middle Eastern History
HIST 3322 Mexican-American History
HIST 3323 African-American History
HUM 3320 Foreign Literature in Translation
HUM 3321 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
MUS 3302 Introduction to African-American Music
MUS 3305 World Musics
POLS 3312 Hispanic Politics
POLS 4308 East and Southeast Asian Politics
POLS 4316 Politics of the Middle East
PSY 4304 Multicultural Psychology
SOC 3304 Minorities in America

 

For students placing out of any foreign language courses, other courses in the humanities or social sciences may be substituted.   Hours in excess of 3 hrs. for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper-Level Requirements (33 hours)

Humanities Core (6 hours)
HUM 3310: Cultural Criticism (3 hours)
HUM 4350: Senior Seminar (3 hours)
HUM 4098:  Portfolio (Enroll the semester before graduation)

 

Humanities Concentration:  Upper-level courses in one of the following humanities disciplines (15 hours)
Art, Communication, Drama, English, French, History, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, or Spanish. Students are encouraged to consult with a faculty advisor before deciding on their concentration.

 

Upper-level courses taken from any of the following disciplines (12 hours)
Art, Communication, Drama, English, French, Spanish, History, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Political Science (4304 and 4306 only), Psychology (PSY 4301 only)

 

Electives (15 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor

 

Bachelor of Arts
Major in Spanish

 

William J. Nowak, PhD, Coordinator
S1009, 713-221-8673

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish is designed especially for professionals and encourages the integration of Spanish language studies as an essential component of professional development. Students will complete a concentration in a field of academic study that suits their professional goals as well as an internship in which the use of Spanish is required. By combining the academic study of Spanish language and culture with the professional world, stu­dents will be well positioned for employment opportunities in which bilingualism is an asset.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Spanish will:

  • Write business letters in Spanish.
  • Write an eight-page (minimum) research paper, producing a coherent argument  to analyze a complex situation or phenomenon.  Proper MLA citation of sources, including at least three in Spanish, is required.
  • Deliver clear and comprehensible oral presentations in academic Spanish, using PowerPoint.
  • Recognize at least three regional variants of spoken Spanish.
  • Engage in and understand professional-level conversations in Spanish.
  • Analyze the historical and literary context of a key Hispanic author or film director, producing a brief written explanation of that author’s or director’s importance.

 

Degree Requirements
The Spanish major requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours toward the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements and the supplemental concentration.  Graduating seniors must submit a portfolio of five of their best written assignments, chosen from work completed in several of their upper-level Spanish courses at UHD.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Preparatory Requirements (18 hours)
English Writing (ENG beyond ENG 1302 with “writing” in the title)
Ethics (most PHIL courses, see an advisor; POLS 3300, BA 3308, or CJ 3311)
Foreign Language* or Hispanic Culture courses (such as HUM 3321 or ENG 3322; see an advisor for options) (12 hours)
* No more than 8 hours of credit will be given for CLEP or retroactive credit. 
* Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in another foreign language or in Hispanic Culture courses.  Hours in excess of 3 hrs. for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper Level Requirements (27 hours)
SPAN 3301 Advanced Grammar and Composition    
SPAN 3302 Professional Writing   
SPAN 3320 Professional Oral Communication    
15 hours upper-level courses in Spanish
SPAN 4098 Portfolio (enrollment in student’s final term or in spring term before summer graduation)
SPAN 4380 Field Experience / Internship

 

Supplemental Concentration in one discipline or area of study* (18 hours)
At least 9 hours must be upper-level (3000-4999). Courses in the supplemental area must be approved by an advisor in conjunction with the Spanish degree coordinator.
* Prerequisites for upper-level business courses may not be waived. See a CHSS advisor to register in business courses. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business.

 

Electives (15 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300, and RDG 1300) may not apply toward graduation requirements. Electives are an important part of the degree pro­gram and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Minor Programs

Students seeking minors in CHSS must maintain a grade point average for all courses taken at UH-Downtown of at least 2.0, receive a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward the minor, and must meet all requirements of the chosen minor, including prerequisites for courses taken toward the minor.  For all minor programs in the Department of Arts and Humanities except Spanish, no more than 3 hrs. of internship/field experience coursework are permitted.  SPAN 4380 may not apply toward the minor in Spanish.

 

Minor in Art
Students may focus on studio art or art history in their minor.  See a CHSS advisor for sample plans. 
Minimum requirements:
A grade point average of 2.0.
A grade of at least C in all ART courses.
A total of 18 hours in ART (or cross-listed HUM courses), including at least 6 hours of upper-level courses, and an approved portfolio.
12 of the 18 required hours, including the required 6 upper-level hours, must be taken at UHD.

 

Minor in Arts Administration
Minimum requirements:
A grade point average of 2.0.
A grade of at least C in all ART and business courses.
A total of 18 hours, including ACC 2301, MGT 3301, and MKT 3301,HUM 3325, HUM 4380 (Field Experience / Internship), and a fine arts elective beyond the common core  fine arts requirement.
      Prerequisites for upper-level business courses may not be waived; See a CHSS advisor to register in business courses.
12 of the 18 required hours must be taken at UHD

 

Minor in Communication Studies
Minimum requirements:
A grade point average of 2.0.
A grade of at least C in all COMM courses.
A total of 18 hours in Communication, including COMM 1306 and  at least 9 upper-level hours in Communication at UHD

 

Minor in Drama
Minimum requirements:
A grade point average of 2.0.
A grade of at least C in all DRA courses
A total of 18 hours in drama, including at least 9 upper-level hours in drama at UHD

 

Minor in Spanish
Minimum requirements:
A grade point average of 2.0.
A grade of at least C in all SPAN courses.
A total of 9 upper-level hours in Spanish at UHD, including SPAN 3301 plus 6 additional upper-level hours in Spanish.
   SPAN 4380 may not apply toward the minor.

 

Department of English

Sandra L. Dahlberg, PhD,  Chair,
S1045, 713-221-8013

 

Faculty

Professors:

Birchak, Dahlberg, Dressman, Harned, Jarrett, Jennings, Thomas

Associate Professors:

Chiaviello, Creighton, Cunningham, Davidson, Farris, Fortunato, Gilbert, Jackson, Kintzele, Lund, Moosally, Pavletich, Robertson, Roundtree, Schmertz, Sullivan, Waters

Assistant Professors:

Bjork, Choudhuri, Duncan, Ellwanger, Hill, Hudson, Jager, Kimberly,Matveeva, Moshiri, Murray, Sample, Scharold,

Lecturers:

Coblentz,Guillory, Howard, Ogle Sanders,  Rubin-Trimble, Williams

Emeriti:

Ahern, Bartholomew, Levy

 

Academic Areas: American studies, composition, Creative Writing, English, Film Studies, Professional Writing,

Honor Society

Sigma Tau Delta, International English Honor Society

Programs of Study

Bachelor of Arts with a major in English

Bachelor of Science with a major in Professional Writing
Master of Science in Professional Writing and Technical
Communication

 

The Department of English offers a wide variety of courses designed to improve students’ communication skills and enhance their appreciation of the literature, thought, and culture of the English-speaking world. To accomplish these goals, the department offers focused degrees and wide-ranging service courses.

 

Degrees

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in English gives students grounding in the language and literature of English. This grounding makes students aware of how cultural forces shape English language and literature and how critical approaches illuminate them. The BA in English offers students a range of educational and career options on graduation, including entrance to graduate and professional schools in preparation for careers in academia and such fields as public policy, social work, and law.

 

The Bachelor of Science with a major in Professional Writing combines the strengths of a solid liberal arts education with practical training and technical expertise. All Professional Writing majors share a core of required upper-level courses and, beyond that core, choose from clusters of courses, and take internships. The combination of flexibility and focus in the degree enables students to prepare to enter such fields as cor­porate communications, medical writing, or computer docu­mentation, or to continue their education in graduate or pro­fessional schools.

 

The Master of Science in Professional Writing and Technical Communication provides professional-level skills or knowledge in document production, rhetorical analysis, ethical and glob­al awareness, and research methodologies. Beginning with four required graduate core courses, students select six more graduate courses and conduct directed research to complete their degree in one of two ways - by writing a thesis or by working in an internship and doing a capstone project. This academic experience provides excellent background for employment in business or industry or for advancement to management-level positions. See the Graduate Academic Programs section, pp. 90-95 for more detail.

 

Service Courses
The English Department’s courses in writing, language, and lit­erature support all degrees offered at the University of Houston-Downtown. In addition, courses taught by department faculty form a major component of the programs of the Bachelor of Arts in Humanities and the Bachelor of Science with a major in Interdisciplinary Studies. In all the courses it offers, the depart­ment seeks to promote cultural and technological literacy and to improve students’ critical thinking skills through analysis, inter­pretation, and evaluation.

Bachelor of Arts

Major in English

 

Sandra L. Dahlberg, PhD, Coordinator
S1045, 713-221-8013

 

Degree Learning Objectives: Students will

  1. Read literary, cultural, and scholarly texts critically by
  • analyzing, through close reading, the rhetorical and aesthetic qualities of texts
  • demonstrating understanding of the characteristics,
    conventions, and techniques associated with various literary genres
  • situating texts within their historical and cultural contexts
  • demonstrating understanding of the literary traditions in U.S., British, and other national literatures
  • Produce mature college-level writing that
  • advances rhetorically astute arguments about texts
  • analyzes texts within their historical and cultural contexts
  • applies a guiding critical methodology
  • employs appropriate scholarly diction and tone
  • Use and document sources appropriately to
  • advance/enrich an argument
  • demonstrate engagement in critical debate

 

Degree Requirements for All English Majors
The English major requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours toward the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Lower-Level Requirements (27 hours)
Foreign language in one language* (through Elementary II) (6 hours)
Fine Arts (3 hours)
Philosophy (6 hours)  (3 hours must be ethics)
Social Sciences (6 hours)
Literature (6 hours) - both halves of a survey of World, American, or British Literature

 

*Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits.  Hours in     excess of 3 for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper-Level Requirements (36 hours)

Genre Courses (9 hours)
ENG 3311 Studies in Poetry
ENG 3312 Studies in Fiction
ENG 3313 Studies in Dramatic Literature

Literature/Theory (15 – 21 hours)
   At least one course must be at the 43XX level.

Writing/English language (6 - 12 hours)
May include Essay Writing, Creative Writing, writing workshops, History of Rhetoric, Studies in the Theory of Rhetoric, Studies in English Grammar, Introduction to the Study of Language, History of the English Language, or upper-level courses in professional writing.

ENG 4098 English Portfolio (in the final term)

Electives (15 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restrictions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300 and below, MATH 0300, MATH 1300, and RDG 1300 and below) may not apply to graduation requirements. No more than 25% of the hours presented for graduation may be credits in business. Included among the electives should be a course (3 hours) in nonverbal analytical skills if this requirement is not fulfilled by an equivalent course in the lower-level or upper-level requirements.

 

Major in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Preparatory Lower-level Requirements (12 hours)
Literature Survey 1:  ENG 2301, 2311, or 2313*
Literature Survey 2:  ENG 2302, 2312, or 2314
Foreign Language in one language through Elementary II (6-8 hours)**
   *Required:  One course in pre-1800 literature**Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits.  Hours in excess of 3 for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper-Level Requirements (36 hours)

Creative Writing Courses (15 hours)
Required (12 hours)
ENG 3309 Introducation to Creative Writing
Genre Workshop 1:  ENG 3343 (Fiction), ENG 3344 (Poetry), or 3345 (Creative Nonfiction)
Genre Workshop 2:  ENG 3343 (Fiction), ENG 3344 (Poetry), or 3345 (Creative Nonfiction)         
ENG 4309  Advanced Creative Writing *

*At least one ENG 43XX is required for the B.A. in English.  ENG 4309, as a required course for the Creative Writing      concentration, satisfies this minimum 4000-level course requirement.   

Elective (3 hours)
ENG 3346 Introduction to Literary Tanslation
ENG 3322 Spanish Translation
ENG 3319 Introduction to the Study of Language
DRA 3308 / HUM 3326 Playwriting
ENG 3399 Directed Study in English (Creative Writing)

Publishing Courses (3 hours)
ENG 3332 Literary Magazine Production
ENG 3330 Desktop Publishing
ENG 3331 Advanced Desktop Publishing
ENG 3335 Publishing for the Web
ENG 4360 Publications Workshop

Genre Courses (6 hours)
ENG 3311 Studies in Poetry
ENG 3312 Studies in Fiction
ENG 3313 Studies in Dramatic Literature

Literature/Critical Theory Courses (12 hours)  
Choose from the following: ENG 3306, 3307, 3314, 3315, 3321, 3322, 3323, 3337, 3339, 3340, 3341, 3347, 3350, 3352, 3353, 3354, 3356, 3357, 3358, 3362, 3363, 3364, 3367, 3377, 3387, 4311, 4312, 4314, 4324, 4327, 4341, or 4350 
English 4098 English Portfolio, a non-credit bearing course

 

Free electives (30hours)

 

Major in English with a Concentration in English Education

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

Preparatory Lower-level Requirements (9 hours)
Literature Survey:  ENG 2301, 2302, 2311, 2312, 2313, or 2314
Foreign Language in one language through Elementary II (6  hours)*
       *Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits.  Placement in FL classes of more than 3 hrs. may result in extra hours.

 

Upper-level English Requirements (36 hours)

Upper-level Literature (18 hours – 3 hours from each area)**
British Literature (3 hours)
ENG 3337 Studies in Medieval English Literature and Culture
ENG 3347 Studies in Early Modern British Literature and Culture
ENG 3358 Studies in 18th Century British Literature and Culture
ENG 3367 Studiies in 19th Century British Literature and Culture
ENG 3377 Studies in British Literature and Culture: 20th Century and Beyond
American Literature (3 hours)
ENG 3362 Studies in the Literature & Culture of the Americas before 1800
ENG 3363 Studies in 19th Century US Literature and Culture
ENG 3364 Studies in US Literature and Culture after 1900
ENG 4312 Literature of the South and Southwest
World Literature (3 hours)
ENG 3341 Postcolonial Studies
ENG 3387 Studies in World Literature and Culture
ENG 4341 Seminar in Postcolonial Studies
ENG 4311 Contemporary Literature (if topic permits, permission needed)
ENG 3307 Shakespeare
ENG 3309 Introduction to Creative Writing
Area Studies (3 hours)
ENG 3355 Young Adult Literature
ENG 3352 Studies in World Mythology and Folklore
ENG 3340 Cultural Criticism
ENG 3370 Theories in Collaborative Learning
    **In addition to ENG 3307,  3 hours of upper-level literature must be taken in pre-19th=-century literature.,

Upper-Level Multicultural Literature (6 hours)
ENG 3321 African American Literature
ENG 3322 Mexican American Literature
ENG 3350 Gender Studies in Literature
ENG 3353 Social Class and Literature
ENG 4324 Seminar in Ethnic Studies
ENG 4350 Advanced Gender Studies

Upper-Level Writing / English Language Courses (6 hours)
Required:  ENG 3305 Essay Writing
Elective (3 additional hours to meet 6-hour requirement for this area)
ENG 3318 Studies in English Grammar
ENG 3319 Introduction to the Study of Language
ENG 3320 History of the English Language

Upper-Level Genre Studies (6 hours)
ENG 3311 Studies in Poetry
ENG 3312 Studies in Fiction
ENG 3313 Studies in Dramatic Literature

Upper-Level Urban Education Courses for Certification (33 hours)   
Note:  Courses identified as belonging to the same Professional Development (PD) series must be taken concurrently.
   Free Standing Courses (6 hours)
PED 3301 Introduction to Special Populations
READ 3309 Teaching Reading in the Content Area (Prerequisite of READ 3305 does not apply to 8-12 certification)

PD 1 (Professional Development 1) (9 hours)***
PED 3305 Understanding the Early Childhood through Twelfth Grade Learner
SED 3312 Organizing and Managing the Classroom Environment in the Secondary School
PED 4380 Field Experience in Urban Public School Classrooms
***At least one semester prior to taking PED 3305 students should take all three sections of THEA and submit the “Form to request admission to the 8-12 teacher certification program to the Department of Urban Education.

PD 2 (Professional Development 2) (9 hours)
SED 3302 Instructional Design to Promote Student Learning
SED 3307 Secondary Teacher Roles in Assessment and Profession
PED 4381 Field Experience in Urban PublicSchool Classrooms II

PD 3 (Student Teaching) (9 hours)
SED 4301 Student Teaching in the Secondary Classroom****
SED 4302 Student Teaching in the Secondary Classroom****
READ 4321 Literacy across the Curriculum
     ****Student Teaching courses require 15-week full-time supervised work in grades 8 – 12 (may be one or more grades).

 

Major in English with a Concentration in Film Studies

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

Preparatory Lower-level Requirements (12 - hours)
Survey 1: ENG 2309 Survey of Film
Survey 2: ENG 2301, 2302, 2305, 2311, 2312, 2313, or 2314
Foreign Language in one language through Elementary II (6 - 8 hours)*
       *Students bypassing foreign language classes because of placement must make up those hours in elective credits. 

 

Upper-level Requirements (36 hours) (At least one 43XX course is required.)
Genre Studies (6 hours)
ENG 3311 Studies in Poetry
ENG 3312 Studies in Fiction
ENG 3313 Studies in Dramatic Literature

Upper-level English Film Studies Courses (15 hours)
ENG 3354 Introduction to Film Studies
ENG 3356 Early Cinema
ENG 3357 Film Theory
ENG 4327 Advanced Film Studies
With approval, any upper-level ENG course with significant Film Studies content

Upper-level CHSS Film Studies Courses (not ENG) (3 hours)
COMM 3317 Film Analysis
HUM 3327 Myth and Film
PHIL 3355 Film and Philosophy
SOC 4302 Socio-Cultural Analysis of Film
SPAN 3385 Introduction to Hispanic Film (taught in Spanish)

Literature / Theory Courses (9 hours)
Choose from the following:  ENG 3306, 3307, 3314, 3315, 3321, 3322, 3323, 3337, 3340, 3341, 3347, 3350, 3352, 3353, 3358, 3362, 3363, 3364, 3367, 3377, 3387, 4311, 4312, 4313, 4314,4324, 4341, or 4350.

Writing / Digital Media (3 hours)
Choose from the following: ENG 3305, 3309, 3327, 3339, 3349, 4339, 4340
ENG 4098 Portfolio, a non-credit bearing course

Free Electives (30 hours)

 

Bachelor of Science
Major in Professional Writing

 

Michelle Moosally, PhD, Coordinator
S1037, 713-221-8254

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BS in Professional Writing will:

  • Design information for print and electronic formats, using multiple modalities
  •  
  •   Produce materials that address contexts outside the classroom (real or simulated)Produce documents that meet the needs of a diverse audience (same topic for more than one audience such as old/young, lay/technical, multicultural)
  • Conduct and use research effectively
  • Use ethical standards in citation, visual design, and language
  • Write clearly and effectively

 

 

Degree Requirements
The professional writing major requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours toward the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Preparatory Requirements (6 hours)
Ethics (any course that satisfies the UHD general education requirement)  (3 hrs.)  )
Sophomore literature course (3 hrs.)   (If a literature course was taken in the core, substitute any sophomore-level course requiring a research paper.)

 

Upper-Level Requirements (30 hours)

Professional Writing Core (18 hours)
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing
ENG 3318 Studies in English Grammar
Theory (3 hrs.) :     ENG 3317, 3327, 3339, or 3349
Research (3 hrs.):  ENG 3304, 3325, 3338, 4306, or 4323
Software (3 hrs.):   ENG 3328, 3330, 3331, 3335, 4340
ENG 4380 Field Experience
ENG 4099 Professional Writing Portfolio (enrollment in final year)

 

Specialty Courses (12 hours).  Choose from the following:  ENG 3304, 3305, 3308, 3309, 3316, 3317, 3320, 3325, 3326, 3327, 3328, 3329, 3330, 3331, 3333, 3334, 3335, 3336, 3338, 3339, 3342, 3345, 3349, 3371, 3373, 3390 (may be repeated when topic varies), 4306, 4318, 4322, 4323, 4339, 4340, 4680 (may not take both 4380 and 4680)

 

Supplemental Content Requirement (12 hours)
Students must take 12 hours in any single discipline or area of study outside of Professional Writing or 12 hours of writing-intensive courses.  At least 9 of these hours must be at the 3000-4000 level.

 

Electives (30 hours)
These electives may be lower-or upper-level electives. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Minor Programs
Students seeking minors in CHSS must maintain a grade point average for all courses taken at UH-Downtown of at least 2.0, receive a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward the minor, and must meet all requirements of the chosen minor, including prerequisites for courses taken toward the minor. 

 

Minor in Creative Writing (18 hours minimum)

Robin Davidson, PhD, Coordinator
S1045,  713-221-2716

Required Courses (9 hours)
ENG 3309 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 4309 Advanced Creative Writing
Workshop from one of the following genres:
ENG 3343 Workshop in Fiction
ENG 3344 Workshop in Poetry
ENG 3345 Workshop in Creative Nonfiction
 
Upper-Level Electives (9 hours)
Students may select electives from the following:
    a second creative writing genre workshop from ENG 3343, 3344, 3345 and/or  
 one literature genre course from ENG 3311, 3312, 3313, 3314, or 3315  and/or
any of the following upper-division  courses:
ENG 3346 Introduction to Literary Translation
ENG 3332 Literary Magazine Production                               
DRA 3308/HUM 3326 Playwriting
ENG 3330 Desktop Publishing
SPAN 3322 Spanish Translation
 or a maximum of 4 hours of foreign language (may be lower-level).

 

Any combination of elective coursework is acceptable as long as students count no more than one additional genre workshop and one literary genre course toward the minor.

 

Minor in Digital Media (18 hours minimum)

 

Jillian Hill, PhD, Coordinator
S1038, 713-226-5575

 

Required Coursework (9 hours)
One of the following theory courses (3 hours)
    ENG 3327 Visual Rhetoric & Literacy
    ENG 3339 Digital Media Theory
    ENG 3349 Rhetoric of Technology
    ENG 3317 Studies in the Theory of Rhetoric
Two of the following application courses (6 hours)
    ENG 3335 Publishing for the Web
    ENG 3336 Writing for the Web
    ENG 3338 Introduction to Usability
    ENG 3390 Topics in Technology Studies &Strategies
    ENG 4340 Social Media Writing

 

Upper-Level Electives (9 hours)
Students may select electives from the following:
    a second theory  course
        ENG 3327 Visual Rhetoric & Literacy
        ENG 3339 Digital Media Theory
        ENG 3349 Rhetoric of Technology
        ENG 3317 Studies in the Theory of Rhetoric
     any other application courses
        ENG 3335 Publishing for the Web
        ENG 3336 Writing for the Web
        ENG 3338 Introduction to Usability
        ENG 3390 Topics in Technology Studies &Strategies
        ENG 4340 Social Media Writing
    plus any of the following upper-level courses
        ENG 3318 Studies in English Grammar
        ENG 3330 Desktop Publishing
        ENG 3371 Public Relations Writing
        ENG 3373 Introduction to Advertising
        ENG 4322 Editing, Rewriting and Copyreading

 

Minor in English (18 hours minimum)

 

Required Courses (9 hours)
Six hours:  both halves of sophomore survey of Western World, American, or British Literature.
Three hours in one of the genre courses (ENG 3311, 3312, or 3313).

Upper-Level Electives (9 hours)
Selected in consultation with an advisor from courses in Literature/Theory and/or Writing/English language.

 

Minor in Professional Writing (18 hours minimum)

 

Required Courses (9 hours)
   ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing
ENG 3330 Desktop Publishing
ENG 4322 Editing, Rewriting and Copyreading

Upper-Level Electives (9 hours)
In consultation with an advisor, courses selected from Professional Writing Core or “Other Requirements” in Professional Writing.

 

Department of Social Sciences

 

Jeffrey Jackson, PhD, Interim Chair
N1009, 713-221-8014

 

Faculty

 

Professors:

Christian, Fairbanks, McCaffrey, Getz, Ryden, Thaker-Kumar

Associate Professors:

Allen, Alvarez, Anderson, Bachman, Branham, Caro, Case, Chadha, Li, Gillette, Henney, Jackson, Kaftan, Linantud, Mobasher, Pavelich, Preuss, Stewart, Westfall, Williams

Assistant Professors:

Babb, Crone, DeFreitas, Eliassen, Elkholy, Johnson, Kane, Portillo, Raymundo, Rubinson

 

Visiting Assistant
Professors:

 

Colón

Lecturers:

Hovsepian, Lopez

Emeriti:

Wright

 

Academic Areas: anthropology, geography, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology

 

Mission and Objectives

The Department of Social Sciences is an interdisciplinary department. Faculty teach courses and conduct research in seven academic areas: anthropology, geography, history, phi­losophy, political science, psychology, and sociology. In addi­tion to classes in these disciplines, we offer interdisciplinary classes in the social sciences. Currently, seveneight undergraduate degrees may be taken in our department: History (BA), Philosophy (BA), Political Science (BS), Psychology (BS), Sociology (BS), Social Sciences (BA or BS).   Beginning in Fall 2014, SOS  will be offering the interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Non-Profit Management. Please come visit us, or call and talk with us about your interests and plans.
The department’s educational philosophy is holistic, emphasiz­ing the importance of educational and professional growth both inside and outside of the classroom. Our degree programs prepare students in a number of ways: students are provided with job skills relevant to their career aspirations, a readiness for graduate or professional school, and a strong, broad-based background in the liberal arts which is important in the ever-changing social and economic environment.

 

The essential components of the department’s mission are community-based research and public service, and these also constitute integral parts of the department’s educational pro­gram. All of the department’s degree programs are designed to develop skills in research and analysis. Students also are strongly encouraged to engage in internships, volunteer serv­ice activities, or other degree-related work experiences in which classroom theory can be applied to “real-life” problems.

 

The study and practice of the social sciences provide the means for students to unify their learning, since the social sciences, in attempt­ing to understand human individuals and institutions, employ both the methodologies of the linguistically-oriented humanistic disci­plines and the empirically-based natural sciences. Thus our unique contribution to the intellectual life of the university is to provide the arena in which all viewpoints can meet and exchange.

 

Honor Societies
Phi Sigma Tau, Philosophy Honor Society
Pi Gamma Mu, International Social Sciences Honorary Society
Phi Alpha Theta. History Honor Society
Psi Chi, National Honor Society in Psychology
Pi Sigma Alpha, National Political Science Honor Society

 

Programs of Study

 

Bachelor of Arts (BA) with majors in:
History
Philosophy
Social Sciences

Bachelor of Science (BS) with majors in:
Political Science
Psychology
Social Sciences
Sociology

Master of Arts (MA) in Nonprofit Management

 

Bachelor of Arts

Major in History


Austin Allen, PhD, Coordinator
N1009, 713-221-5217

 

A Bachelor of Arts in History provides students with the intellectual discipline and research, analytical, and communication skills that will prepare them for careers in teaching, governmental agencies and non-profit organizations, and also the private sector. Students interested in pursuing a professional degree in law, history, or other disciplines in the Social Sciences and Humanities should find the skills offered by the History Degree to be particularly useful to them in their future studies.

The history program d requires students to cultivate an intellectually disciplined approach to factual data and historical works that will manifest itself in the students' developing research, analytical, and communication skills. All courses offered by the History Degree Program seek to foster this development.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a history degree will:

  • Demonstrate historical awareness of the United States' development
  • Demonstrate historical awareness of  global change
  • Demonstrate the intellectual discipline necessary for historical study
  • Demonstrate the research skills necessary for historical study
  • Demonstrate the mastery of academic conventions appropriate to historical writing
  • Demonstrate the mastery of academic conventions appropriate to spoken discourse

 

Degree Requirements for All History Majors
The Bachelor of Arts with a major in History requires a mini­mum of 120 hours, with 33 hours in history courses. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours in the degree and 18 of the upper-level hours in the major must be successful­ly completed in residence at UHD. An overall mini­mum grade point average of 2.0 at UH-Downtown is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be main­tained in the upper-level requirements in the major.

 

Common Core Requirements  (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.  (History majors/minors who take HIST 2303 Texas History or HIST 2309 Ethnic Minorities in American History to fulfill the state-mandated 6 hours of history required in the core must substitute advanced courses for the major requirements below.)

 

Preparatory Requirements (27 hours)
These courses are preliminary requirements for the degree and are in addition to the core curriculum:
HIST 3390 Historical Methods  (Students should take this course early in the sequence.  It is a “W” or writing-intensive course)
HIST 2315 Introduction to World History I
HIST 2316 Introduction to World History II
3 hours in political science, sociology, or psychology ‘
3 hours in philosophy at the 3000 or 4000 level
3  hours in literature at the 3000 or 4000 level
6-8 hours in the same foreign language* (hours depend  upon placement exams, courses taken, or transfer credit) 
3 hours in math, natural science, or any other course that fulfills the “S course” requirement
     *Hours bypassed by placement must be made up in elective credits.  Hours in excess of 3 for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Advanced History Requirements:  18 hours

  • 9 upper-level hours non-U.S. History  (Students may count HIST 4390 Special Topics and 3399 Directed Studies courses with non-U.S. topics for any of these hours.)  These courses also satisfy a “W course” requirement.  Select from HIST 3301, 3308, 3310, 3317, 3318, 3324, 3333, 3334, 3335, 3336, 4310, 4320, 4322, and 4340.
  • 9 upper-level hours U.S. History  These courses, except for HIST 2303, also satisfy a “W course” requirement,  Select from HIST3304, 3305, 3306, 3311, 3312, 3313, 3314, 3322, 3323, 3330, 331, 3332, 4301, 4303, 4304, 4305, 4306, 4307, 4370.    HIST 2303 Texas History may be substituted for one of these UL U.S. History courses. Students may also count HIST 2303 Texas History, HIST 4390 Special Topics and 3399 Directed Studies courses with U.S. topics for any of these hours.

 

Upper-Level Concentration:  9 hours  (Students may apply free elective hours toward a minor and/or teaching certification.)

  • Minor:  18 hours.  To earn a minor in CHSS, a student must meet the academic requirements specified by the minor program, meet all course prerequisites, and maintain a grade point average of at least 2.0 for all courses taken at UHD and applied to the minor.   To declare a minor, history majors must file the Minor Declaration Form with a CHSS advisor.
  • Teacher Certification Courses:  See the requirements in the Department of Urban Education in the College of Public Service for information relating to Secondary Education certification and/or see BA History: Concentration in Secondary Education below.
  • Self-Directed Concentration:  Students may elect to take at least 9 hours in upper-level courses in any single discipline or area of study.  For example, students planning to teach in public schools may consider related fields such as political science or economics. Alternatively, students may elect to concentrate in additional history courses in order to fulfill this self-directed concentration requirement.

 

Free Electives (24 hours)
Students will need to take other courses as necessary to fulfill the minimum of 120 hours needed to complete the degree requirements.  These may be from any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and READ 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Major in History with a Concentration in Secondary Education

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours) 
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this catalog.  Students with a concentration in education must take HIST 1305 and HIST 1306 to fulfill the history core requirement.

 

Prescribed Elective Courses (12hours)
6-8 hours in the same foreign language.  Hours depend  upon placement exams, courses taken, or transfer credit.  Any hours bypassed because of placement must be made up as a free elective. Hours in excess of 3 hrs. for each FL course may be applied to the free elective.
3 hours in math or natural science courses
3 hours in philosophy at the 3000 or 4000 level

 

Free Elective Course (3 hours)

 

Required History Courses (30 hours + 6 hours of HIST 1305 and 1306 in core)
HIST 2303 Texas History
HIST 2315 World History I
HIST 2316 World History II
HIST 3390 Historical Methods
9 hours in U.S. History at the 3000 or 4000 level
9 hours in non-U.S. History at the 3000 or 4000 level

 

Free Standing Education Courses (6 hours)
PED 3301 Introduction to Special Populations
READ 3309 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas (prerequisite of READ 3305 does not apply to 8-12 certification)

Note:  Courses identified as belonging to the same Professional Development series must be taken concurrently.

 

Professional Development 1 Education Courses* (9 hours)
PED 3305  Understanding the Early Childhood through Twelfth Grade Learner
SED 3312  Organizing the Classroom
PED 4380  Field Experience in Urban Public Classrooms
  *At least one semester prior to taking PED 3305, students should take all three sections of the THEA and submit the “Form to request admission to the 8-12 teacher certification program” to the Department of Urban Education. 

 

Profesional Development 2 Education Courses (9 hours)
SED 3302 Instructional Design
SED 3307 Secondary Teacher Roles in Assessment and Profession
PED 4381 Field Experience in Urban Public School Classrooms

 

Professional Development 3 Student Teaching (9 hours)
SED 4301**  Student Teaching in Secondary Schools
SED 4302**  Student Teaching in Secondary Schools
READ 4321  Literacy across the Curriculum
**Student Teaching courses require 15-week full-time supervised work in grades 8 – 12 (may be one or more grades).

 

Certification Checklist
Undergraduate degree plan completed?
TexES Content test passed?
TexES PPR test passed?
A cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5?


Bachelor of Arts

Major in Philosophy

Andrew Pavelich, PhD, Coordinator
N1047, 713-221-8094

 

Philosophy majors study the history of Western thought and the foundational ideas behind all institutions and thinking belonging to Western society and beyond. The Philosophy program at UHD emphasizes both the study of major figures and movements in the history of philosophy as well as the application of philosophical ideas to social and political problems, including questions about the meaning of life. Philosophy not only broadens a student’s horizon of knowledge, but above all develops the capacity for critical thinking, analysis, the art of persuasive writing and reading skills. UHD Philosophy majors are prepared to go on to graduate school in philosophy, as well as to engage in advanced study of law, medicine, and a variety of other disciplines.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Philosophy will
•  Analyze philosophical texts.
•  Construct and analyze philosophical arguments.
•  Perform basic secondary research in philosophy.
•  Write well-reasoned philosophical essays.
•  Identify and explain the major figures from the history of philosophy.
•  Demonstrate the ability think through perspectives other than their own.
•  Communicate and exchange ideas verbally
  

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy requires a mini­mum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours in the degree and 18 of the upper-level hours in the major must be successful­ly completed in residence at UHD. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for gradua­tion, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog.

 

Philosophy Course Requirements (30 hours):
Two courses in the history of Philosophy: PHIL 2301 and 2302.
One advanced course in moral philosophy: PHIL 3301, 3310, 3313, 3320, or 3330.
One advanced course in logic: PHIL 3304 or 3384.
One 4000-level course: either PHIL 4312 (Major Figures in Philosophy) or 4399 (Directed Studies).
15 additional hours in philosophy, at least 9 of which must be 3000 or above.
One non-credit portfolio class (4099) in the semester of expected graduation.

 

Non Philosophy Course Requirements (24 hours):
6-8 hours of a foreign language. If a student is able to bypass foreign language classes because of placement, any hours not transcripted must be made up in elective credits. Hours in excess of 3 hrs. for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.18 hours of classes from within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, in any discipline, 9 hours of which must be at the 3000 level or above.

 

Elective Courses (24 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with a faculty member..

Bachelor of Science

Major in Political Science

David Branham, PhD, Coordinator
N1066, 713-221-8208

 

The program in political science leading to a Bachelor of Science degree is designed to prepare a student for graduate school in political science as well as other disciplines, including law, history, economics, and anthropology. It is also excellent grounding in the operations of governmental, political, and other complex organizations.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BS in Political Science will

  • Be able to do written research in political science
  • Be proficient in understanding quantitative and qualitative political science research
  • Demonstrate an ability to orally present their political science research in a comprehensive, clear and organized manner
  • Demonstrate broad knowledge of United States and foreign governments and political science
  • Be able to present political arguments logically and assess opposing political arguments critically
  • Be proficient in the use of current technology to complete political science assignments
  • Adhere to the UHD Academic Honesty Policy in doing political science research

 

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Science with a major in Political Science requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours in the degree and 18 of the upper-level hours in the major must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHDis required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements.

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog. In fulfillment of the Behavioral Sciences requirement, PSY 1303 is recommended.

Preparatory Requirements (15 hours)

These courses are preliminary requirements for the degree and are in addition to the core curriculum:
SOS 2304 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences
Geography or Economics (6 hours in any combination)
Math or Natural Science (3 hours)

 

Upper Level Requirements (36 hours)
ENG 3302, 3308, or 3326
SOS 4301 or 4380
POLS 4399

 

18  hours from 3000-4000 level Political Science courses. Within these 18 hours, majors must complete at least one course from each of the following subfields: International Politics, Political Theory/Pre-law, and U.S. Politics.
International Politics:  Select from POLS 3308, 4305, 4308, 4309, 4310, 4312, 4314, 4316, and 4318.
Political Theory/Pre-law:  Select from POLS 3300, 3304, 3306, 3313, 4301, 4314, and 4320.
U.S. Politics: Select from POLS 3301, 3302, 3303, 3307, 3309, 3310, 3311, 3312, 3314, 4306, 4307, 4311, 4315, 4317, 4319, and 4321. 9 additional hours in Political Science or advisor approved courses

 

Electives (27 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and READ 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. One of the courses must be in Ethics unless the requirement is filled elsewhere. An English course with “literature” in the title is recommended. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be select­ed in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Psychology

 

Stephanie Babb, PhD, Coordinator
N1072, 713-223-7918

 

The program in psychology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree may prepare a student for graduate school in psychology and other disciplines. It also serves as preparation for entry - level positions in the field of mental health and other types of employ­ment, including social service agencies and business. The study of psychology also provides a foundation of knowledge for healthy coping with life circumstances and human relationships.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BS in Psychology will

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology
  • Evaluate and apply basic research methods in psychology including research design, data analysis, and interpretation of results
  • Use the scientific approach to develop a research question, and use critical thinking to evaluate and synthesize empirical findings
  • Apply psychological principles to personal and social issues
  • Exhibit the ability to act ethically, recognize diversity, and engage and social duties
  • Use information and technology when doing work in psychology
  • Demonstrate effective writing and collaboration skills

 

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Science with a major in Psychology requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours in the degree and 18 of the upper-level hours in the major must be successfully completed in residence at UHD An over­all minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level Major Requirements and the Related Upper-Level Requirements.

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog. In fulfillment of the Behavioral Sciences requirement, PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology is recommended. If not taken in the core, PSY 1303 should be added to the following preparatory requirements.

 

Preparatory Requirements (21-24 hours)
These courses are preliminary requirements for the degree and are in addition to the core curriculum, with the possible excep­tion of one three-hour course in introductory behavioral science that may have been taken as part of the core:
PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology (if not taken in the core)
SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology (if not taken in the core)
ANTH 2301 Physical Anthropology or ANTH 2302 Cultural Anthropology
PSY 3320 Research Methods in Psychology
SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences
Three hours in philosophy to fulfill the general education requirement in ethics.   PHIL 3301 Moral Issues, Personal and Professional, is the preferred course.
Any additional three hours in mathematics or natural science.
Any additional three hours in literature.

 

Major Requirements (27 hours)
PSY 2302 Social Psychology
PSY 2310 Human Growth and Development
PSY 3311 Biological Psychology
PSY 3319 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 4306 Theories of Personality
Nine additional hours in PSY at the 3000 or 4000 level
Three hours of internship or special project credit from either S0S 4301 Special Projects in the Social Sciences or SOS 4380 Field Experience in the Social Sciences

 

Related Upper-Level Requirements (9 hours)
These are upper-level courses in support of the degree. Courses in this category, together with courses chosen as free electives, may be used toward a minor, at the student’s option:

 

Advanced Writing , one of the following courses:
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing
ENG 3325 Medical Writing
ENG 3326 Proposal Writing
ENG 4306 Science Writing

 

Social and Behavioral Science Electives, two of the following courses:
Any additional upper-level course in PSY
Any additional upper-level course in SOC
Any additional upper-level course in SOCW, except practicums/internships
CJ 3301 Criminology
CJ 3306 Crime and Delinquency
CJ 3311 Ethics of Social Control
CJ 3316 Victimology
CJ 3317 Race and Crime
CJ 4305 Correctional Counseling
COMM 3308 Family communication
COMM 3309 Theory and Practice of Interviewing
COMM 3310 Men, Women, and Communication
COMM 3313 Race, Ethnicity, and Communication
COMM 3315 Small Group Communication
COMM 3319 Communication in Conflict
COMM 3328 Communication and Intimacy
ENG 4313/HUM4313 Psychology through Literature
MGT 3301 Management of Organizations
MGT 3302 Human Resource Management
MGT 3303 Negotiating Skills and Techniques
MKT 3301 Principles of Marketing
PHIL 3315 Philosophy of Psychology
PHIL 3317 Philosophy of Race
PHIL 3319 Philosophy of Gender
SOS 3301 Social Gerontology
SOS 3304 Death and Dying
SOS 4302 The Study of the Future
SOSE 3306 Culture of the Urban School
SOSE 3320 Assessment and Evaluation of Children

 

Note:  prerequisites for the above courses cannot be waived.  See a CHSS advisor to confirm prerequisites for MGT and MKT courses.

 

Free Electives (21 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and READ 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Sociology

 

Joanna Kaftan,  PhD, Coordinator
N1060, 713-221-8299

The program in sociology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree may prepare a student for graduate school in sociology or in other disciplines of behavioral or social sciences. It also serves as preparation for entry-level positions in public sector social service agencies or in business. The study of sociology pro­vides a unique perspective for studying complex social problems including poverty, deviant behaviors such as crime, violence, and drug use.  Further, courses in sociology address the functional importance of social institutions such as the family, religion, government, education, mass media, and health care delivery.

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BS in Sociology will

  • Articulate what it means to have a sociology imagination
  • Explain the scientific method including: induction, deduction, criteria for a sound argument, and ethical practices in conduct of sociological research
  • Discuss key sociological concepts
  • Articulate basic assumptions of the main sociological theoretical perspectives
  • Summarize basic empirical findings in various substantive areas of sociology including: social inequality, minority groups, deviance, family, migration, and globalization

 

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Science with a major in Sociology requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. The last 30 of the total hours in the degree  and 18 of the upper-level hours in the major must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. A mini­mum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum average of 2.0 must be main­tained in the upper-level Major Requirements and the Related Upper-Level Requirements. 

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements on page 26 of this Catalog. In fulfillment of the Behavioral Sciences requirement, SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology is recommended. If not taken in the core, SOC 1303 should be added to the following supplemental requirements.

 

Supplemental Course Requirements (18-21 hours)
These courses are preliminary requirements for the degree and are in addition to the core curriculum, with the possible excep­tion of one three-hour course in introductory behavioral science that may have been taken as part of the core:
PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology
SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology (if not taken in the core)
ANTH 2301 Physical Anthropology or ANTH 2302 Cultural
Anthropology
SOS 2304 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences
Three hours in philosophy to fulfill the general education requirement in ethics. PHIL 3302 (Philosophy of Science) is the preferred course. Another upper-level philosophy course may be substituted at the discretion of the degree coordinator.
Three hours in mathematics, science, or computer science.

 

Additional Requirements (9 hours)
   Six hours of lower-level or upper-level sociology courses
   Three hours of lower-level or upper-level sociology, social sciences, psychology, or anthropology electives

 

Major Requirements (27 hours)
Twenty-one hours of courses in Sociology at the 3000 or 4000 level
Three hours of SOC 4315 Sociological Theory
Three hours of special project or internship credit from either SOS 4301 Special Projects in the Social Sciences, similar to a senior honors thesis, or SOS 4380 Field Experience in the Social Sciences, recommended

 

Related Upper-Level Requirements (9 hours)
These are upper-level courses in support of the degree. Courses in this category, together with courses chosen as free electives, may be used toward a minor, at the student’s option:

 

Advanced Writing (3 hours), one of the following courses:
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing
ENG 3325 Medical Writing
ENG 3326 Proposal Writing
ENG 4306 Science Writing

 

Social and Behavioral Science Electives (6 hours), two of the following courses:
Any upper-level course in Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, History, Anthropology, Philosophy, English, Communication, Humanities, Social Sciences, or Criminal Justice
BA 3301 Legal Environment of Business
BA 3302 Commercial Law
BA 3304 International Business Law
BA 3315 Diversity and the Law
BIOL 4350 Social Biology
MGT 3301 Management of Organizations
MGT 3302 Human Resources Management
MGT 3303 Negotiating Skills and Techniques
MGT 3307 Equal Opportunity Management
MKT 3301 Marketing Principles
MKT 4305 Consumer Behavior
SOSE 3306 Culture of the Urban School
SOSE 3320 Assessment and Evaluation of Children
Note:  Prerequisites for business courses cannot be waived, and approval from a CHSS advisor is required for registration. 

 

Free Electives (15 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and READ 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor. No degree program may have fewer than 120 semester credit hours.

 

Interdisciplinary Degrees

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in Social Sciences (described in the following sections) are interdisciplinary degrees meant to prepare the graduate with a general foundation across the social sciences, and the experience of deeper inquiry in at least two areas of study in the social sciences. For purposes of these degrees, the social sci­ences include history, political science, psychology and sociolo­gy. Because this is an interdisciplinary degree, no more than 18 hours of upper-level work in a single discipline may be applied to the major, and no more than 27 total hours in a single disci­pline (excluding course work required to fulfill Common Core Requirements) may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

 

Degree Requirements
The Bachelor of Arts with major in Social Sciences requires a min­imum of 122 hours, including a foreign language requirement. The Bachelor of Science with major in Social Sciences requires a minimum of 120 hours. For degree completion, at least 25% of the semester credit hours must be earned through instruction offered by UHD. For both degrees, the last 30 of the total hours and 18 of the upper-level hours toward the degree must be successfully completed in residence at UHD. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 at UHD is required for graduation, and a minimum grade point average of 2.0 must be maintained in the upper-level requirements in the major. A description of these interdisciplinary degrees follows.

 

Bachelor of Arts

Major in Social Sciences


Joanna Kaftan, PhD, Coordinator
N1060, 713-221-8299

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BA in Social Sciences will

  • Demonstrate an understanding of social science theory
  • Demonstrate proficiency in empirical social science research
  • Demonstrate the mastery of academic conventions appropriate to writing within the social sciences

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog. In fulfillment of the Behavioral Sciences require­ment, PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology is recommended. If not taken in the core, PSY 1303 should be taken as part of the follow­ing additional basic requirements.

 

Additional Basic Requirements (27  hours)
SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology or PSY 1301 Introduction to Psychology
ANTH 2301 Physical Anthropology or ANTH 2302 Cultural Anthropology
SOS 2304 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences 
Literature (3 hours)
Foreign language (a single foreign language through 2301 or 2311 plus  3 hours of either 2302 or 2312 or a course focusing on a specific culture). For students placing out of any foreign lan­guage courses, other courses in English, humanities or social sciences may be substituted to obtain a minimum of 120 hours.  Hours in excess of 3 hrs. for any FL course may be applied toward a free elective.

 

Upper-Level Requirements (36 hours)
Eighteen  upper-level hours in social sciences from the follow­ing disciplines: History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology

  • At least three courses (9 hours) must be taken in each of two separate disci­plines.
  • No more than 18 upper-level hours in a single discipline may be applied to the major.

    Nine upper-level hours in social sciences or related disciplines (history, political science, psychology, sociology, or anthropology)
PHIL 3301 Moral Issues or another course to fulfill the ethics requirement
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing or another upper-level ENG course with “writing” in the title
SOS 4380 Field Experience in the Social Sciences (recommended) or SOS 4301 Special Projects in the Social Sciences

 

Electives (15 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Bachelor of Science

Major in Social Sciences

 

Joanna Kaftan, PhD, Coordinator
N1060, 713-221-8299

 

Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates who earn a BS in Social Sciences will

  • Demonstrate an understanding of social science theory
  • Demonstrate proficiency in empirical social science research
  • Demonstrate the mastery of academic conventions appropriate to  writing  within the social sciences

 

Common Core Requirements (42 hours)
See listing under Common Core Requirements in this Catalog. In fulfillment of the Behavioral Sciences require­ment, PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology is recommended. If not taken in the core, PSY 1303 should be added to the follow­ing additional basic requirements.

 

Additional Basic Requirements (18 hours)
SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology   or PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology
ANTH 2301 Physical Anthropology or ANTH 2302 Cultural Anthropology
S0S 2304 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences
Literature (3 hours)
Mathematics or Natural Sciences (3 hours)

 

Upper-Level Requirements (36 hours)
Eighteen upper-level hours in social sciences from the follow­ing disciplines: History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology

  • At least three courses (9 hours) must be taken in each of two separate disci­plines.
  • No more than 18 upper-level hours in a single discipline may be applied to the major.
  • Nine upper-level hours in social sciences or related disciplines (history, political science, psychology, sociology, or anthropology)

PHIL 3301 Moral Issues or another course to fulfill the ethics requirement
ENG 3302 Business and Technical Report Writing or another upper-level ENG course with “writing” in the title
SOS 4380 Field Experience in the Social Sciences (recommended) or SOS 4301 Special Projects in the Social Sciences

 

Electives (24 hours)
From any department at any level, with the following restric­tions: Developmental courses (ENG 1300, MATH 0300, MATH 1300 and RDG 1300) may not apply to graduation require­ments. No more than 25% of the hours presented for gradua­tion may be credits in business. Electives are an important part of the degree program and should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor.

 

Minor Programs

Students seeking minors in CHSS must maintain a grade point average for all courses taken at UH-Downtown of at least 2.0, receive a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward the minor, and must meet all requirements of the chosen minor, including prerequisites for courses taken toward the minor.  All minor programs in the Department of Social Sciences require at least 9 hours upper-level coursework in residence at UHD.  Internship/field experience courses may not apply toward any minors in the Department of Social Sciences.

 

Minor in History (18 hours minimum)
Six hours of US History courses from the common core
Twelve additional hours of 3000/4000-level History courses

 

Minor in International Politics (18 hours minimum)
POLS 2303 United States Government I
POLS 2304 United States Government II
POLS 3308 Introduction to World Politics
POLS 4399 Political Science Capstone Seminar
Six  hours from among the following courses:
POLS 4305 War in the Modern World
POLS 4308 East and Southeast Asian Politics
POLS 4309 Dictatorship and Democracy in the Developing World
POLS 4310 International Terrorism
POLS 4312 Dictatorship and Democracy in Europe and the US
POLS 4314 US Foreign Policy since WWII
POLS 4316 Politics of the Middle East
POLS 4318 International Political Economy

 

Minor in Philosophy (15 hours minimum)
Six hours of 1000/2000-level Philosophy courses
Nine hours from among the following courses:
PHIL: any 3000/4000-level course
HUM 3301 Foundations of Western Culture I
HUM 3302 Foundations of Western Culture II
At least six of the 15 hours must be taken at UHD.

 

Minor in Political Science (18 hours minimum)
POLS 2303 United States Government I
POLS 2304 United States Government II
POLS 4399 Political Science Capstone Seminar
Nine additional hours of 3000/4000 level Political Sciences courses

 

Minor in Psychology (18 hours minimum)
PSY 1303 Introduction to Psychology
15 additional hours, including nine hours of 3000/4000-level courses, from among the following:
PSY any course
SOS 2308 Human Sexuality
SOS 3301 Social Gerontology
SOS 3304 Death and Dying
SOSE 3320 Assessment & Evaluation Adolescents &
Children

 

Minor in Public Policy and Administration (18 hours minimum)
POLS 2303 United States Government I
POLS 2304 United States Government II
POLS 3301 Introduction to Public Administration
Nine hours from among the following courses:
POLS 3300 Ethics in Public Life
POLS 3302 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 3303 Urban Politics
POLS 4307 Participation and Democracy in American Politics
POLS 4315 Education Policy and Administration
POLS 4317 State and Local Government
POLS 4319 Non-Profit Organizations in American Society
POLS 4399 Political Science Capstone Seminar

 

Minor in Quantitative Methods in Research (18 hours minimum)
Group A: Lower Level Preparatory requirements (6 hours)
SOS 2304 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
MATH 1305 Finite Mathematics with Applications
Group B: Upper-Level Course work (9 hours)
STAT 3310 Statistical Analyses and Applications II
Select two of the following:
STAT 4306 Mathematical Models and Computer Simulation
STAT 4307 Time Series
STAT 4309 Design and Analysis of Experiments
STAT 4310 Applied Regression
PSY 4308 Psychological Assessment
Group C: Select one of the following (3 hours)
PHIL 3302 Philosophy of Science
PHIL 33042 Logic
PHIL 4315 Symbolic Logic
SOS majors seeking this minor will need the following courses as part of their regular degree:
MATH 1301 serves as a prerequisite for most of the courses in this minor.
SOS 3312 or STAT 3309 may serve as prerequisites for STAT 3310SOS 3312 Statistics in the Social Sciences

 

Minor in Sociology (18 hours minimum)
SOC 1303 Introduction to Sociology
15 additional hours, including nine hours of 3000/4000-level courses, from among the following:
SOC any course
SOS 2308 Human Sexuality
SOS 3301 Social Gerontology

 

Pre-Law Studies

Edgardo Colon, PhD, Advisor
N1094, 713-221-2749

Students interested in pre-law studies, regardless of their major, may contact Dr. Colón. Catalogs of many law schools also are available for review through the pre-law advisor.

 

Air Force ROTC
(Cooperative Program with University of Houston)
To register for courses, inquire in the Department of Social Sciences, 713-221-8014. For all other purpos­es, contact the Air Force Science program at UH, 713-743-4932.

 

Col. Phil Bossert, Commander

 

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training (ROTC) program prepares men and women of character, commitment, and courage to assume leadership positions as commissioned officers in the active duty United States Air Force. Upon completion of the curriculum, students will have a thorough understanding of the core values, leadership, teamwork, and other requirements to be an effective officer in the US Air Force.
All courses and physical training sessions take place at the University of Houston. Flight orientation occurs at airports in the Houston metro area.

 

Course Credit
ROTC classes may be taken for elective credit toward any degree plan at the University of Houston-Downtown. Freshman and sophomore level classes are open to all students. No military obligation is incurred as a result of enrollment in these courses. Junior and senior level courses are more restrictive and do require a military obligation. ROTC scholarship students also incur a military obligation.

 

Four-Year Program
The General Military Course (GMC) is the first half of the four-year ROTC program and is taken during the freshman and sophomore years. This program allows the student to experience Air Force ROTC without obligation (unless the student is on an Air Force ROTC scholarship).

 

Each semester of the GMC consists of one classroom hour of instruction as well as Leadership Laboratory each week. During the first two years, the student will learn about the Air Force and the historical development of aerospace power. During the summer preceding the junior year, the student will compete for the opportunity to attend a four-week Field Training Unit. Successful completion of field training is mandatory for entrance into the Professional Officer Course (POC), the junior and senior years of the four-year program.

 

As a junior, the student will study the core values, leadership, teamwork, and management tools required to become an effective Air Force officer.

 

During the senior year students study the national security policy process, regional and cultural studies, and complete final requirements for commissioning as second lieutenants.  Enrollment in the POC is open to graduate students if they have four semesters of school remaining. Each semester of the POC consists of three classroom hours of instruction as well as Leadership Laboratory each week.

 

Leadership Laboratory
As an Air Force ROTC cadet, each student is required to attend an additional two-hour class known as Leadership Laboratory.

Although not part of the academic class requirement, it is an essential element of officer training. Leadership Laboratory is an intensive, military training program in which students gain invaluable leadership and managerial experience while learning about the Air Force way of life. Students have numerous opportunities to hear guest speakers and panel discussions, participate in field trips, and experience practical leadership exercises.

 

AFROTC Scholarship Opportunities
Air Force ROTC offers various scholarship opportunities for students at the University of Houston-Downtown:

 

In-College Scholarship Program (ICSP)—is a highly competitive scholarship program aimed primarily at college freshmen and sophomores in any major (students with a bachelor's degree can compete to earn a master’s degree). The ICSP awards cover tuition capped at either $15,000 per year plus $750 per year for books or $9,000 per year plus $750 per year for books.

 

The Express Scholarship Program—is operated on a fully qualified basis: those who meet the qualifications are awarded the scholarship. Though the list of eligible college majors differs from year to year, the express scholarship pays up to $15,000 tuition per year and $750 for books. Recent majors which qualified for express scholarships included electrical engineering, computer science, and strategic foreign languages. The processing of the scholarship award is completed at the local detachment.

Stipend

All AFROTC scholarship recipients and POC cadets receive a nontaxable monthly stipend. The annual stipend amount ranges from $2,000 per year to $4,000 per year depending on the recipient's enrollment year.

For additional information on AFROTC scholarship opportunities, please visit the AFROTC website at www.afrotc.com or call 1-800-4AFROTC.

 

Field Training (FT)
Cadets completing the General Military Course attend four weeks of field training (FT) during the summer at a selected Air Force base. Those who have not completed the GMC attend an extended FT Unit. This rigorous program of leadership training, physical conditioning and academics assesses the cadet's potential to be an Air Force officer.
Cadets also receive survival and firearms training and career information.  Cadets receive travel pay and daily pay for FT.

 

Flight Orientation Program
All cadets can volunteer to participate in a joint Air Force ROTC/Civil Air Patrol flight orientation program.  This consists of eight flights, four in the front seat of a small passenger aircraft and four additional flights in the back seat as an observer.  In addition, an abbreviated flying ground school course is taught in the ROTC classrooms using FAA textbooks.  The flight orientation and ground school course are both free for all cadets.

 

Physical Fitness Training
Cadets meet three times per week at 0600 at the University of Houston Alumni Center to perform physical fitness training.  The training is mandatory and emphasizes push-ups, sit-ups, and running in order to pass the USAF physical fitness test.

 

Professional Development Training (PDT)
Cadets are eligible to compete to attend PDT during the summer months.
PDT consists of several programs, including:
•   Tours of nearby active duty Air Force bases
•   Soaring and free-fall parachuting at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA)
•   Cultural and Foreign Language Immersion
•   Hands-on research at Air Force laboratories
•   Shadowing a Air Force officer in Operation Air Force
•   Internships at NASA and other government organizations
Cadets receive travel pay and daily pay for the majority of these
programs.

 

Army ROTC


(Cooperative Program with University of Houston)
To register for courses, inquire in the Department of Social Sciences, 713-221-8014. For all other purpos­es, contact the Military Science program at UH, 713-743-3875.

 

Lt. Col. Anthony Landry, Chair

The goal of the US Army ROTC program is to develop techni­cally competent, physically fit and highly motivated men and women for positions of responsibility as commissioned officers in the active Army, the Army Reserve and National Guard. Upon completion of the curriculum, students will have an understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of the military as an art and as a science. The leadership and managerial experience gained through ROTC provides great benefit for students in both their civilian endeavors and their military careers.

 

Statutory Authority
General statutory authority for establishment and operation of the ROTC program, including the scholarship program, is con­tained in Title 10, United States Code, Chapter 103 (Sec. 2102­2111). Specific rules and procedures are found in US Army Regulation 145-1.

 

Course Credit
ROTC classes may be taken for elective credit toward any degree plan at the University of Houston-Downtown. Freshman and sophomore level classes are open to all students, regardless of age or physical condition. No military obligation is incurred as a result of enrollment in these courses. Junior and senior level courses are more restrictive and do require a military obliga­tion. ROTC scholarship students also incur a military obligation.

 

Four-Year Program
The four-year program is divided into two courses: the basic course, which is normally attended by students during their freshman and sophomore years, and the advanced course, attended during the junior and senior years. Advanced course students attend a six-week advanced camp at Fort Lewis, Washington, normally between their junior and senior years.

 

Basic Course
The basic course consists of four semesters of military science, which includes: MSCI 1210, 1220, 2210 and 2220. These freshman and sophomore level classes are open to all students without obligation.

 

Advanced Course
Students entering the advanced course must enter into a con­tract to pursue and accept a commission in the active Army, the Army Reserve or the National Guard. To be considered for con­tracting into the advanced course, the student must be a full-time student in a course of instruction that leads to a degree in a rec­ognized academic field, have a minimum of two years of aca­demic work remaining in a curriculum leading to a baccalaure­ate or advanced degree, be under age 30 when commissioned, and pass a physical examination.

 

Two-Year Program
The two-year program is designed for students who did not take the basic course but are otherwise eligible to enroll in the advanced course. This program allows students completing their sophomore year to attend a five-week “basic camp” during June and July at Fort Knox, Kentucky, in lieu of taking the first two years of ROTC. There is no military obligation for attending Basic Camp. The Army provides transportation, room, and board. Students are paid approximately $700 for the five-week period.

 

Laboratory Requirements
A military science laboratory is required for students enrolling in MSCI 1210, 1220, 2210, 2220, 3310, 3320, 4310 and 4320. This laboratory provides opportunities for marksmanship training, rappelling, drill and ceremonies, communications training, and other activities.

 

Veterans
Veterans who have served on active duty or in the Army Reserve or National Guard are also eligible for the ROTC pro­gram. Although veterans are not required to take the Basic Course, they are encouraged to do so. All students, including veterans, must have a minimum of 60 credit hours prior to enrolling in the Advanced Course.

 

National Guard and Army Reserve Members
Students enrolled in ROTC may also be a member of the Army Reserve or National Guard. Through the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP), those students enrolled in the Advanced Course will be assigned in a leadership position as a cadet and receive pay and entitlements from the Guard or Reserve in the pay grade of Sergeant
(E-5).

Scholarships

The United States Army offers, on a competitive nationwide basis, four-, three-, and two-year scholarships. The scholarships will cover up to $16,000 of tuition. Recipients will also receive benefits for educational fees (to include lab fees), a book allowance and a subsistence allowance of $200 per month. Applicants must be US citizens and must be under age 27 on the anticipated graduation date. Applications are available from the military science department. Veteran applicants can extend the age limit up to a maximum of three years, based on prior active duty service.

 

Other Financial Aid
All students enrolled in the Advanced Course will receive a sub­sistence allowance of $200 per month. For more information contact the Military Science Department at the University of Houston (713-743-3875). GI Bill recipients still retain benefits.

 

Tuition
Members of the Army or the National Guard, Texas State Guard, or other reserve forces may be exempted from the non­resident tuition fee and other fees and charges.

 

Special Training
Basic and advanced course students may volunteer for and attend the US Army Airborne and Air Assault courses during June, July and August. Cadet Troop Leadership training posi­tions are also available to Advanced Course cadets during the summer months.

 

Miscellaneous
Cadets in the Advanced Course are paid an allowance of $200 per month during the school year. Military textbooks and uni­forms are furnished to all cadets. The Corps of Cadets sponsors an annual military ball in addi­tion to other social events throughout the school year. The Department of Military Science at the University of Houston sponsors extracurricular activities such as the University of Houston Color Guard and the Ranger Challenge Team.

 

 


 


 

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